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I am writing some code in C:

int main(){
    char guess[15];
    guess = helloValidation(*guess);
    return 0;
}

And my function is:

char[] helloValidation(char* des) {
    do {
        printf("Type 'hello' : ");
        scanf("%s", &des);
    }while (strcmp(des, "hello") != 0);
        return des
}

But it is giving me this error:

incompatible types in assignment 
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The guess array is modified by the function itself. You are then trying to reassign the array pointer guess, resulting in an error. Not to mention incorrectly trying to reference *guess or using &des incorrectly. I suggest you read up on C pointer/array concepts.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

char* helloValidation(char* des) {
    do {
        printf("Type 'hello' : ");
        scanf("%s", des);
    } while (strcmp(des, "hello") != 0);
    return des;
}

int main() {
    char guess[15];
    helloValidation(guess);
    return 0;
}
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thank you brother that worked. –  Muhammad Muaz Jun 24 '12 at 23:40
    
There's no point in helloValidation having a return value. –  Jim Balter Jun 25 '12 at 1:16
    
@JimBalter - By that argument, there is no point in strcpy having a return value. –  Unsigned Jun 26 '12 at 14:58
    
By your argument, no method should be void. It's a ridiculous argument. This method does not need to return des; it only does because of the OP's initial confusion. That strcpy returns it's argument is irrelevant, a bit of ancient standardized history. –  Jim Balter Jun 27 '12 at 17:01
2  
@JimBalter - Where did you get the idea no method should be void? Regardless, I was not trying to rewrite the OP's code, merely correct mistakes. This question and answer have excellent examples of situations in which returning an argument can be quite useful (such as eliminating the need for extraneous temporary variables). –  Unsigned Jun 28 '12 at 15:04
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The scanf statement is incorrect! It should read as:

scanf("%s", des);
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you can't assign it back to guess, and in your case, you don't have to as you are passing guess into the function ( get rid of that * )

So the function is going to change guess ( not a copy of it ) so no need to try and assign it back

helloValidation(guess);
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thanks for help. actually its 5am here :P and my mind is blasting cuz of programming since 4days –  Muhammad Muaz Jun 24 '12 at 23:40
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since you're passing guess into the helloValidation function and using it in a scanf, there's no need to return it and reassign it back to the char[] reference.

Replace

guess = helloValidation(*guess);

with

helloValidation(*guess);

You're getting the error because the guess reference has already been allocated on the stack. You can't write over it. Had guess been a pointer, you could write over the value in the pointer, however that doesn't touch the memory that's there.

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1  
Keith Nicholas's answer above is correct for the parameter! –  t0mm13b Jun 24 '12 at 23:41
    
I said the exact same thing as Keith. –  mj_ Jun 24 '12 at 23:43
    
Keith Nicholas said "get rid of that *"... –  t0mm13b Jun 24 '12 at 23:45
    
Have a look at this for a quick refresher - stackoverflow.com/questions/2124935/c-strings-confusion/… :) –  t0mm13b Jun 24 '12 at 23:47
    
"I said the exact same thing as Keith" -- Only if the word "exact" is redefined. –  Jim Balter Jun 25 '12 at 1:18
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