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I have a set of objects, and am interested in getting a specific object from the set. After some research, I decided to use the solution provided here: http://code.activestate.com/recipes/499299/

The problem is that it doesn't appear to be working.

I have two classes defined as such:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, a, b, c):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c
    def __key(self):
        return (self.a, self.b, self.c)
    def __eq__(self, other):
        return self.__key() == other.__key()
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self.__key())

class Bar(Foo):
    def __init__(self, a, b, c, d, e):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c
        self.d = d
        self.e = e

Note: equality of these two classes should only be defined on the attributes a, b, c.

The wrapper _CaptureEq in http://code.activestate.com/recipes/499299/ also defines its own __eq__ method. The problem is that this method never gets called (I think). Consider,

bar_1 = Bar(1,2,3,4,5)
bar_2 = Bar(1,2,3,10,11)
summary = set((bar_1,))
assert(bar_1 == bar_2)
bar_equiv = get_equivalent(summary, bar_2)

bar_equiv.d should equal 4 and likewise bar_equiv .e should equal 5, but they are not. Like I mentioned, it looks like the __CaptureEq __eq__ method does not get called when the statement bar_2 in summary is executed.

Is there some reason why the __CaptureEq __eq__ method is not being called? Hopefully this is not too obscure of a question.

share|improve this question
    
How are you determining that the method isn't called? Just because the result isn't what you expect? Did you try tracing it? –  Karl Knechtel Jun 25 '12 at 1:48
    
Yeah, it isn't called... odd. –  Hamish Jun 25 '12 at 1:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Brandon's answer is informative, but incorrect. There are actually two problems, one with the recipe relying on _CaptureEq being written as an old-style class (so it won't work properly if you try it on Python 3 with a hash-based container), and one with your own Foo.__eq__ definition claiming definitively that the two objects are not equal when it should be saying "I don't know, ask the other object if we're equal".

The recipe problem is trivial to fix: just define __hash__ on the comparison wrapper class:

class _CaptureEq:
    'Object wrapper that remembers "other" for successful equality tests.'
    def __init__(self, obj):
        self.obj = obj
        self.match = obj
    # If running on Python 3, this will be a new-style class, and
    # new-style classes must delegate hash explicitly in order to populate
    # the underlying special method slot correctly.
    # On Python 2, it will be an old-style class, so the explicit delegation
    # isn't needed (__getattr__ will cover it), but it also won't do any harm.
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self.obj)
    def __eq__(self, other):
        result = (self.obj == other)
        if result:
            self.match = other
        return result
    def __getattr__(self, name):  # support anything else needed by __contains__
        return getattr(self.obj, name)

The problem with your own __eq__ definition is also easy to fix: return NotImplemented when appropriate so you aren't claiming to provide a definitive answer for comparisons with unknown objects:

class Foo(object):
    def __init__(self, a, b, c):
        self.a = a
        self.b = b
        self.c = c
    def __key(self):
        return (self.a, self.b, self.c)
    def __eq__(self, other):
        if not isinstance(other, Foo):
            # Don't recognise "other", so let *it* decide if we're equal
            return NotImplemented
        return self.__key() == other.__key()
    def __hash__(self):
        return hash(self.__key())

With those two fixes, you will find that Raymond's get_equivalent recipe works exactly as it should:

>>> from capture_eq import *
>>> bar_1 = Bar(1,2,3,4,5)
>>> bar_2 = Bar(1,2,3,10,11)
>>> summary = set((bar_1,))
>>> assert(bar_1 == bar_2)
>>> bar_equiv = get_equivalent(summary, bar_2)
>>> bar_equiv.d
4
>>> bar_equiv.e
5

Update: Clarified that the explicit __hash__ override is only needed in order to correctly handle the Python 3 case.

share|improve this answer
    
Given that _CaptureEq is an old-style class, why are you adding a method with a comment that talks about new-style classes? You can verify with a print statement that __getattr__() was returning functions just fine, I believe. –  Brandon Rhodes Jun 25 '12 at 4:53
    
But, good job on pointing out that the guy who sees himself being compared to the _CaptureEq instance can just refuse to do the comparison — I always forget how those fall-through cases work because I never override operators myself. –  Brandon Rhodes Jun 25 '12 at 4:55
    
If you want it to work on Python 3 as well, you need to force the __hash__ delegation. I'll update the comment. –  ncoghlan Jun 25 '12 at 5:00
2  
FWIW, failing to return NotImplemented for unknown types is probably the single most common bug when overriding binary operators in Python. It typically only gets discovered when someone tries to reuse the type outside its original context. –  ncoghlan Jun 25 '12 at 5:12
2  
The overhead of exceptions is too high to be usable for this purpose, hence why NotImplemented is distinct from NotImplementedError :) –  ncoghlan Jun 25 '12 at 5:19

The problem is that the set compares two objects the “wrong way around” for this pattern to intercept the call to __eq__(). The recipe from 2006 evidently was written against containers that, when asked if x was present, went through the candidate y values already present in the container doing:

x == y

comparisons, in which case an __eq__() on x could do special actions during the search. But the set object is doing the comparison the other way around:

y == x

for each y in the set. Therefore this pattern might simply not be usable in this form when your data type is a set. You can confirm this by instrumenting Foo.__eq__() like this:

def __eq__(self, other):
    print '__eq__: I am', self.d, self.e, 'and he is', other.d, other.e
    return self.__key() == other.__key()

You will then see a message like:

__eq__: I am 4 5 and he is 10 11

confirming that the equality comparison is posing the equality question to the object already in the set — which is, alas, not the object wrapped with Hettinger's _CaptureEq object.

Update:

And I forgot to suggest a way forward: have you thought about using a dictionary? Since you have an idea here of a key that is a subset of the data inside the object, you might find that splitting out the idea of the key from the idea of the object itself might alleviate the need to attempt this kind of convoluted object interception. Just write a new function that, given an object and your dictionary, computes the key and looks in the dictionary and returns the object already in the dictionary if the key is present else inserts the new object at the key.

Update 2: well, look at that — Nick's answer uses a NotImplemented in one direction to force the set to do the comparison in the other direction. Give the guy a few +1's!

share|improve this answer
2  
it should be set((bar_1,)) - question is valid, but some errors in the code (fixed a couple of problems myself already) –  Hamish Jun 25 '12 at 1:57
    
Another solution might be to turn _CaptureEq into a subclass of Bar - that would ensure that y == x calls x.__eq__(y) first. –  lvc Jun 25 '12 at 2:58
    
@Brandon - that's just it, I want the value of the object in the set. The recipe appears to work with sets on the trivial example given its documentation, i.e., >>> get_equivalent(set([1, 2, 3]), 2.0) # 2.0 is equivalent to 2. Thanks for the insight... –  j0nnyf1ve Jun 25 '12 at 3:08
2  
No need for any radical changes - the definition of Foo.__eq__ is just buggy and needs to be fixed to avoid breaking the recipe. See my answer for a version that works as requested. –  ncoghlan Jun 25 '12 at 4:41

There are two issues here. The first is that:

t = _CaptureEq(item)
if t in container:
    return t.match
return default

Doesn't do what you think. In particular, t will never be in container, since _CaptureEq doesn't define __hash__. This becomes more obvious in Python 3, since it will point this out to you rather than providing a default __hash__. The code for _CaptureEq seems to believe that providing an __getattr__ will solve this - it won't, since Python's special method lookups are not guaranteed to go through all the same steps as normal attribute lookups - this is the same reason __hash__ (and various others) need to be defined on a class and can't be monkeypatched onto an instance. So, the most direct way around this is to define _CaptureEq.__hash__ like so:

def __hash__(self):
   return hash(self.obj)

But that still isn't guaranteed to work, because of the second issue: set lookup is not guaranteed to test equality. sets are based on hashtables, and only do an equality test if there's more than one item in a hash bucket. You can't (and don't want to) force items that hash differently into the same bucket, since that's all an implementation detail of set. The easiest way around this issue, and to neatly sidestep the first one, is to use a list instead:

summary = [bar_1]
assert(bar_1 == bar_2)
bar_equiv = get_equivalent(summary, bar_2)
assert(bar_equiv is bar_1)
share|improve this answer
    
If you will add some print statements you will see that __hash__ is indeed being looked up through the __getattr__ and that the lookup is indeed successful, because the _CaptureEq is an old-style class. Yes, I know—Raymond Hettinger used an old-style class to better wrap something more completely than is possible today! He is a crazy, crazy guy. –  Brandon Rhodes Jun 25 '12 at 2:37
1  
This is incorrect. In fact __getattr__ does solve the hashing problem by deferring to self.obj.__hash__, and set lookup is guaranteed to test equality when the hashes match. Hashes must differ for unequal objects, but they can match for unequal objects, so each "hash bucket" in principle can contain arbitrarily many objects with the same hash, and possibly none of them are actually the object being looked up, so each must be tested for equality. __hash__ = lambda x: 1 is a technically-correct hash function, it's just not a useful one. –  Ben Jun 25 '12 at 2:42
    
@Ben is absolutely correct: since all sorts of objects can share the same hash, a set must perform an equality check before returning True to an in test. Only if the test finds the hashes unequal can it short-circuit and assume that the objects themselves are unequal without a further test. –  Brandon Rhodes Jun 25 '12 at 2:44
    
@BrandonRhodes ah, you learn something new every day. The difference will old-style classes will teach me to have Py2 around for testing these things, and sets testing equality more often than I thought seems amazingly obvious in hindsight. I suppose that does me for new stuff for two days... or at least one and a half. –  lvc Jun 25 '12 at 2:53
    
I must admit that today is the day that I myself also learned this about old-style classes — if I ever knew this in years past, I had certainly forgotten until I added the print statement a few minutes go as I tried to figure out the order in which these methods were being called! We should tell Raymond that he is too obscure. :) –  Brandon Rhodes Jun 25 '12 at 2:54

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