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I am having trouble passing the return value from TheMethod() to Main and displaying the word if the if statement is passed as true.

I have thought of two ways of doing this, neither has worked but I think I am missing synatx.

  1. Using a return ?; non void method and then displaying the returned value.
  2. Using a void method and actually writing out(example below)

So yes I am new at this, however I have made so many iterations everything is blending together and I have forgot what I have tried. Any help on the syntax be great for either of these ways.

Basically I need it to iterate numbers

1,2,3,4 and depending on if the current iteration matches an expression in the if statements it will display a word.

Example:

if (3 = i)
{
   Console.WriteLine("Word");
}

Code:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Proj5
{
class Program
{
    int i = 0;



    static void Main(int i)
    {

        for (i = 0; i < 101; i++)
        {

            Console.WriteLine("test");
        }
    }

    string TheMethod(int i)
    {
        string f = "Word1";
        string b = "Word2";


        if (i == 3)
        {
            return f;
        }

        if (i == 5)
        {
            return b;
        }

        if (0 == (i % 3))
        {
            return f;
        }

        if (0 == i % 5)
        {
            return b;
        }
        else
        {
            return b;
        }

    }
}
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Note: You don't need if i == 5 and a separate one for i % 5 == 0. % is "mod" which means the remainder after the division, so 5 / 5 = 1, there is no remainder so 5 mod 5 = 0...

Here is a rough guide/fix for you attempt at FizzBuzz:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace Proj5
{
class Program
{
    private static void Main()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < 101; i++)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(TheMethod(i));
        }
    }

    string TheMethod(int i)
    {
        string f = "Fizz";
        string b = "Buzz";

        if ((i % 3 == 0) && (i % 5 == 0))
        {
            return f+b;
        }
        if (i % 3 == 0)
        {
            return f;
        }

        if (i % 5 == 0)
        {
            return b;
        }

        return i.ToString();

    }
}
}

However there are cleaner solutions:

string result = "";
for (int i = 1; i < = 101; ++i)
{
    if ((i % 3 == 0) && (i % 5 == 0)) result += "FizzBuzz";
    else if (i % 3 == 0) result += "Fizz";
    else if (i % 5 == 0) result += "Buzz";
    else result += i.ToString();
    result += ", ";
}

Or, if you prefer LINQ-y Lambas:

public static void FizzBuzz()
{
    Dictionary<Func<int, bool>, Func<int, string>> rules = new Dictionary<Func<int, bool>, Func<int, string>>();
    rules.Add(x => x % 5 == 0 && x % 3 == 0, x => “fizzbuzz”);
    rules.Add(x => x % 3 == 0, x => "fizz");
    rules.Add(x => x % 5 == 0, x => "buzz");
    rules.Add(x => x % 5 != 0 && x % 3 != 0, x => x.ToString());
    rules.Add(x => true, x => "\n");

    var output = from n in Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
                 from f in rules
                 where f.Key(n)
                 select f.Value(n);

    output.ToList().ForEach(x => Console.Write(x));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Your code does something different from the code in the question - returning f+b in one case instead than either f or b - but it appears that you know already the problem somehow (calling it 'FizzBuzz'), and so you are providing the solution to the problem you know and not direcly the answer - is this the case? –  MiMo Jun 25 '12 at 3:25
1  
..and why Main(int i) ? Where does that integeer parameter will come from? (and it is not used...) –  MiMo Jun 25 '12 at 3:27
    
It seems as though the OP doesn't want to say that he's having trouble with FizzBuzz, it's a common programming test that a lot of us use when hiring grads. It's a simple way of weeding out people who can't code. The rules are iterate from 0-N if i is a multiple of three print Fizz, if it's a multiple of 5 print Buzz, if it's a multiple of both print FizzBuzz, else print the number... As for main(int i) I didn't even notice that, I copied that from the OPs code.. I'll fix it now! :) –  Vijay Jun 25 '12 at 3:29
    
Thanks - that explains it. –  MiMo Jun 25 '12 at 13:33

You can't refer to non-static variables (i) and methods (TheMethod) from inside your static Main class. Try this:


class Program
{
static void Main()
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 101; i++)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(TheMethod(i));
    }
}

static string TheMethod(int i)
{
    string f = "Word1";
    string b = "Word2";

    if (i%3 == 0) return f;
    if (i%5 == 0) return b;
    return b;
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Well, someone thinks my answer is crap. Not sure why... –  McGarnagle Jun 25 '12 at 3:13
    
If you're returning then why bother with an else? - I down voted because you added in else statements, misleading a person who would take your word for it that they're required! :-P –  Vijay Jun 25 '12 at 3:14
1  
@Vijay Sir, you make a compelling point ... –  McGarnagle Jun 25 '12 at 3:15
    
For that I remove my down vote :) –  Vijay Jun 25 '12 at 3:18
1  
I did not downvote, but the else if after a return are not really necessary as you state, and the (i == 3) and (i == 5) tests are redundant. –  MiMo Jun 25 '12 at 3:20

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