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This is my code, it deals with threads. I am having problem in run(), due to which I am not able to compile it. If any one knows how to call a method with the DateFormat argument, please let me know.

import java.text.DateFormat;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;

class Base implements Runnable {
  static DateFormat format =
  DateFormat.getDateInstance(DateFormat.MEDIUM);
  public Date parse(String str) throws ParseException {
    synchronized (getClass()) {
      return format.parse(str);
    }
  }

  @Override
  public void run() {
/*Date date = new Date(111111);
DateFormat dateF = DateFormat.getDateInstance(DateFormat.FULL, Locale.US);
date.getDateInstance(dateF);*/
parse("Hello"); 
  }
}

class Derived extends Base implements Runnable{
  public Date doSomethingAndParse(String str) throws ParseException {
    synchronized(Base.class) {
      System.out.println("Derived Class");
      return format.parse(str);
    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    Derived d = new Derived();
    Thread t = new Thread(d);
    Thread t2= new Thread (d);
    t.start();
    t2.start();

  }

  @Override
  public void run() {

getClass();
    try {
        doSomethingAndParse("1111111111");
    } catch (ParseException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
System.out.println("Run in Derived Class");

  }
}
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pass an int value to the function , and you can then switch case based upon it –  Satya Jun 25 '12 at 4:17
    
welcome to stackoverflow. PLEASE try to format source code so it's readable. –  Ollie Jones Jun 26 '12 at 2:36
    
99% of the posted code has nothing to do with your question. Reduce your code to the 1 or 2 lines that illustrate your question, which I guess has something to do with passing a DateFormat object or format String (it isn't clear) to a method. See SSCCE for more on what I'm talking about. –  Bohemian Jun 26 '12 at 2:40

1 Answer 1

To avoid hassle between US-Format and DE, I used SimpleDateFormat in my example. Apart from that, it is pretty much your code:

import java.text.*;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.util.Date;

class Base implements Runnable {

    // DateFormat format = DateFormat.getDateInstance (DateFormat.MEDIUM);
    DateFormat format = new SimpleDateFormat ("YYYY-MM-dd");

    public Date parse (String str) throws ParseException {
        return format.parse (str);
    }

    @Override
    public void run () {
        try {
            parse ("Hello");
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            e.printStackTrace ();
        }
    }
}

class Derived extends Base implements Runnable {

    public Date doSomethingAndParse (String str) throws ParseException {
        System.out.println ("Derived Class");
        return format.parse (str);
    }

    @Override
    public void run () {
        try {
            doSomethingAndParse ("1962-10-08");
        } catch (ParseException e) {
            e.printStackTrace ();
        }
        System.out.println ("Run in Derived Class");
    }

    public static void main (String [] args) {
        Derived d = new Derived ();
        Thread t1 = new Thread (d);
        Thread t2 = new Thread (d);
        t1.start ();
        t2.start ();
    }
}

I removed the "static" modifier from DateFormat format, and the " synchronized" parts. See the javadocs for Dateformat - it isn't threadsave, so why would you use the same format in different Threads? Avoid it!

Javadocs:

Synchronization

Date formats are not synchronized. It is recommended to create separate format instances for each thread. If multiple threads access a format concurrently, it must be synchronized externally.

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