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So I have a class with a wrapper class inside like so:

public class RandomClass<TK, TV>
{
    internal class RandomClassWrapper<TK, TV> : RandomClass<TK, TV> {}
}

Now the reason for this is, that RandomClassWrapper is using the new keyword, to override the behaviour of some of the methods in RandomClass. This is because I only want my library to be able to access these functions.

It also needs to modify some of the private variables in RandomClass, which is why it is nested.

However, When I want to initialize this, I have to go

var rc = new RandomClass<int, int>.RandomClassWrapper<int, int>();

Why is that first <int, int> required? Why couldn't it just be wrote like this:

var rc = new RandomClass.RandomClassWrapper<int, int>();

Is there any way that I can avoid having to type that extra <int, int> which can turn into things like: <Dictionary<string, nameofclass>, List<thisistoolong>>

That is an exaggeration, but you understand what I mean. Having to put those types twice is a huge waste of space.

Can anyone suggest a different approach?

Since this helps to clear up the question a bit, I'll bring attention to these two comments:

So, is your question "why can't the compiler infer the generic arguments to RandomClassWrapper from the arguments to RandomClass? – Ed S. 3 mins ago

@EdS. That is one component of the question, yes. The other, is: Since it can't, is there an alternate approach / hack that can clean this up and avoid having to type the generic arguments twice. – caesay just now

share|improve this question
    
So, is your question "why can't the compiler infer the generic arguments to RandomClassWrapper from the arguments to RandomClass? – Ed S. Jun 25 '12 at 4:56
    
@EdS. That is one component of the question, yes. The other, is: Since it can't, is there an alternate approach / hack that can clean this up and avoid having to type the generic arguments twice. – caesay Jun 25 '12 at 4:59
    
@EdS. Eh, I suppose that's a preference thing. Either way would satisfy me, but neither works. – caesay Jun 25 '12 at 5:05
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The second class is nested within the outer generic class, so there's no need for the type respecification.

internal class RandomClassWrapper : RandomClass<TK, TV> {}

Should compile correctly, then you just need to specify one set of generics, as the nested class automatically shares the types:

var rc = new RandomClass<int, int>.RandomClassWrapper();

What you need to realize is that under the hood, new class definitions are generated by the compiler for each different set of generic types (poor wording, I think). This means that

RandomClass<int, int> is already a different definition to RandomClass<string, string> and thus its internal nested class is also already contained within a seperate generic definition.

share|improve this answer
    
It's important to note that one could perfectly legitimately have an OuterClass<T1,T2>.InnerClass<T3,T4>, where all four types were different (or any combination of them matched). If, it would be meaningless for T3 to be anything other than T1, or T4 other than T2, the types should be omitted. In some cases, however, one may want to have inner types with generic parameters that are different from those of the outer types. – supercat Jun 25 '12 at 17:53
    
That doesn't really pertain to the question, where there was generic redundancy in the code. Your point is correct, but in this particular application, I believe the restating of the generic types was simply an understanding issue, and they can safely be omitted. – Jason Larke Jun 25 '12 at 18:03
    
I agree that the original code was redundant; my point was that it may be helpful to understand that the reason the compiler seemed to require the types to be "restated" is that the inner types were completely unrelated to the outer ones, so the inner generics had a total of four generic type parameters. The compiler wasn't requiring that any types be restated--it was merely requiring that all four types be specified. – supercat Jun 25 '12 at 18:15

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