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Why does following program crash, I have base class whose destructor is not virtual but child class destructor is virtual

#include <iostream>
class Base {
public:
  Base() {
    std::cout << "Base::Base CTOR " << std::endl;
  }
  ~Base() {
    std::cout << "Base::Base DTOR " << std::endl;
  }
private:
protected:
};

class Child : public Base {
public:
  Child(){
    std::cout << "Child::Child CTOR " << std::endl;
  }
  virtual ~Child(){
    std::cout << "Child::Child DTOR " << std::endl;
  }
private:
protected:
};
int main ( int argc, char **argv) {
  Base *ptr = new Child;
  delete ptr;
}
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3  
Base class destructor should be virtual –  Mohammad Jun 25 '12 at 5:23
    
you should make your base class destructor virtual, see this link for more details parashift.com/c++-faq-lite/virtual-functions.html#faq-20.7 –  Sanish Jun 25 '12 at 6:01
    
did it crash after or writing "Base::Base DTOR " or did it never write this out? –  Walter Jun 25 '12 at 8:50
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you are observing is called "undefined behavior". Make Base's dtor virtual if you want do call delete on Child instance through Base pointer.

From the 2003 standard, 5.3.5/3:

In the first alternative (delete object), if the static type of the operand is different from its dynamic type, the static type shall be a base class of the operand’s dynamic type and the static type shall have a virtual destructor or the behavior is undefined.

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Can you tell why is it UB? –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 5:25
    
@unkulunkulu: Because he is lying to the compiler about the memory he wants freed. –  Václav Zeman Jun 25 '12 at 5:26
    
memory freed doesn't depend on the destructor called directly (well, it could if there're some memory resources held by Child). Actually, I was looking for exact statement, what constitutes to this being UB, ideally it would be a reference to the standard. –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 5:29
    
@unkulunkulu: Done above. –  Václav Zeman Jun 25 '12 at 5:31
    
thanks, didn't know about that somehow. –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 5:32
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You have undefined behavior because the static type of the pointer operand to delete does not match the dynamic type of the object that it points to and you don't meet the requirements for the exception to this rule that allows passing a pointer to a base class to the object being deleted because this exception requires the base class to have a virtual destructor.

Any behaviour is possible including the code working "as expected" or a crash.

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You could consider rephrasing a bit, because the word 'exception' confused me (I thought about C++ exceptions). Actually, I understood your answer only after reading @wilx's quote from the standard. –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 5:35
    
@unkulunkulu: I've considered rephrasing but right now I can't think of a better word than 'exception' to describe an exception to a rule. –  Charles Bailey Jun 25 '12 at 5:38
    
But you can rephrase not only by replacing this work, you could add another sentence, like 'you can't do that, but there's an exception, but in your case, you dont't meet the requirements' or something :D –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 5:40
    
@CharlesBailey: There is no such an exception: ivoking a method from a base pointer will always call the base method if that method is not virtual. And delete invokes the destructor that is itself a method. I don't see any exceptional behavior here: the wrong function had been invoked producing an unexpected result. –  Emilio Garavaglia Jun 27 '12 at 6:21
    
@EmilioGaravaglia: I'm talking about the exception to the rule that the static type of the pointer that you pass to delete must match the dynamic type of the object being deleted. I'm sorry if this wasn't clear. –  Charles Bailey Jun 27 '12 at 6:34
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Hope this example helps you get the point:

#include <iostream>
class Base {
public:
 Base() {
    std::cout << "Base::Base CTOR " << std::endl;
 }
 ~Base() {
   std::cout << "Base::Base DTOR " << std::endl;
 }
private:
protected:
};

class Child : public Base {
 public:
 Child(){
std::cout << "Child::Child CTOR " << std::endl;
  }
  ~Child(){
std::cout << "Child::Child DTOR " << std::endl;
 }
  private:
 protected:
 };
  class gChild : public Child {
   public:
   gChild(){
    std::cout << "Child::Child gCTOR " << std::endl;
   }
  ~gChild(){
    std::cout << "Child::Child gDTOR " << std::endl;
  }
private:
protected:
};
int main ( int argc, char **argv) {
    Base *ptr = new gChild;
 delete ptr;
}

if virtual ~Base() ,then all destructors' print gets printed.

if virtual ~child() or virtual ~gChild(),only base destructor gets printed.

It's because the destructors executes in opposite direction.and here behaviour is undefined.You must define the base destructor virtual to get the expected result.

Thanks.

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Just look at this:

#include <iostream>

class Base
{
public:
    void nonvirtualmethod()
    { std::cout << "Base nonvirtualmethod" << std::endl; }
    virtual void virtualmethod()
    { std::cout << "Base virtualmethod" << std::endl; }
};

class Derived: public Base
{
public:
    void nonvirtualmethod()
    { std::cout << "Derived nonvirtualmethod" << std::endl; }
    virtual void virtualmethod()
    { std::cout << "Derived virtualmethod" << std::endl; }
};

int main()
{
    Derived d;
    Derived* pd = &d;
    Base* pb = &d;    //< NOTE: both pd and pb point to the same object

    pd->nonvirtualmethod();
    pb->nonvirtualmethod();
    pd->virtualmethod();
    pb->virtualmethod();
}

I gives you the following output:

Derived nonvirtualmethod
Base nonvirtualmethod
Derived virtualmethod
Derived virtualmethod  //< invoked by a Base*

This is because there is a difference between the static type of the pb pointer (Base*) and the dynamic type it points to (Derived). The difference between virtual and plain methods is that non-virtual methods follow the the static type mapping (so a Base pointer invokes Base::methods), while virtual methods follow the chain of the runtime types, hence if a Base* points to a Derived, the Derived method will be called.

Destructors, in this sense, are nothing special: if it is not virtual, a Base pointer will not invoke the Derived one, hence you are left with an half-destroyed object, that is given back to the memory store.

The reason why this is UB (and not simply denied), is because the "memory store" is not managed by the language itself, but from the platform the program is hosted in: the crash most likely depends on the fact that the missing of the Derived part (still alive) will result in the operating system trying free a block of memory with a wrong starting address.

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