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The below Note seems to be ambiguous to me[found in a book of C++].

It is possible to declare an unnamed Bit-Field to create padding in order to implement a specific object layout.

What does the author want to convey from the above note?

I tried the following programs to understand but still not clear.`

class s
{
    public:
    unsigned  i:1;
};

int main()
{
    s x;
    x.i=1;
    cout<<x.i<<endl; //outputs 1
    return 0;
}

How the program is working perfectly without giving any warning or error?

I am using ideone[C++ (gcc-4.3.4)] : http://ideone.com/bLLz4

However, if i remove unsigned from the declaration, it gives the error:

prog.cpp:7: error: ISO C++ forbids declaration of ‘i’ with no type   

Another problem

class s
{
    public:
    int i:1;
};

int main()
{
    s x;
    x.i=1;
    cout<<x.i<<endl; //outputs -1
    return 0;
}

Does the output -1 depend upon the machine architecture['Endianness']?
How the output is coming -1?
http://ideone.com/XWbak

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1  
in 'unsigned i', the keyword "unsigned" is not the name of the member, that's the type. "i" is the name (which is indeed optional). For the second, an signed int (on x86, unsure of others) has the same number of negative values as nonnegative values. So for one bit, values are -1 and 0. –  Mooing Duck Jun 25 '12 at 6:13
    
(Im going to bed. If anyone wants to extend that into a full answer feel free) –  Mooing Duck Jun 25 '12 at 6:18
    
I have two questions. What two or more meanings are you finding in the 'ambiguous' quotation; and why do you think the code shouldn't compile and work? –  EJP Jun 25 '12 at 7:51

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An unnamed bit field, as the name implies, is one that has no name. Your unsigned i:1; is not unnamed; its name is i. The name is optional; the type is not.

The C standard (I'll quote N1570) says, in 6.7.2.1p12:

A bit-field declaration with no declarator, but only a colon and a width, indicates an unnamed bit-field. As a special case, a bit-field structure member with a width of 0 indicates that no further bit-field is to be packed into the unit in which the previous bit-field, if any, was placed.

For example:

struct foo {
    unsigned int x:1;
    unsigned int  :0;
    unsigned int y:1;
};

Note that bit fields cannot be used to reliably specify object layout, since many aspects of their representation are implementation-defined.

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