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I am not sure if this question is already answered. But here it goes:

I was wondering if it's possible to do something like

template<typename...classes>
void createObject(){

  //pass each type into my template function wich takes one type only.

}

I'm really not getting how it exactly works. The reason I can't provide any function arguments is because my template function which should be called within the method only takes one type. This is because it returns an object depending on it's type.

Any suggestion?

Note: GCC 4.6.2

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1  
can you qualify better what the fuction is supposed to do and what it should return? Do the returned objects have somehow common type between them? –  Emilio Garavaglia Jun 25 '12 at 6:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
template<typename...>
struct caller;

template<typename T, typename...Rest>
struct caller<T, Rest...>
{
     static void call()
     {
        create<T>();
        caller<Rest...>::call();
     }
};

template<>
struct caller<>
{
     static void call()
     {
     }
};

//since you've not mentioned the return type, I'm assuming it to be void
//if it is not void, then I don't know what you're going to return, and HOW!   
template<typename...classes>
void createObject(){
      caller<classes...>::call();
}

Demo : http://ideone.com/UHY8n


Alternative (a shorter version):

template<typename...>
struct typelist{};

template<typename T, typename ... Rest>
void call(typelist<T,Rest...>)
{
  create<T>();
  call(typelist<Rest...>());
};

void call(typelist<>) { }

template<typename...classes>
void createObject(){
      call(typelist<classes...>());
}

Demo : http://ideone.com/cuhBh

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1  
Yes it's suppose to be void. Could you please elaborate on what you are doing exactly. I realise it becomes recursive. But don't see how. You seem to declare "call" twice. –  Sidar Jun 25 '12 at 6:45
    
@Sidar: Search metaprogramming in C++; see few examples, as that will help you to get start with it, which will make it easier for me to explain that I did. Otherwise, I've to spend a lot of time, typing a mini tutorial here (which I can't do, as I'm in office now). –  Nawaz Jun 25 '12 at 6:51
    
Very well then. Thanks for your answers. –  Sidar Jun 25 '12 at 6:55

One way is to use the following function to expand the calls:

template <typename... Ts>
void swallow(Ts&&...) {
}

I'll assume you want to call the following function:

template <typename T>
void create() {
}

In this case, you'll need a helper function that converts the void create to one that returns something, so that we can expand it in the arg-list of swallow (if your create function is already non-void, then this extra step is not necessary):

template <typename T>
int createHelper() {
    create<T>();
    return 0;
}

template<typename... Ts>
void createObject(){
    swallow(createHelper<Ts>()...);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I take Ts&&... forwards the next type? But this one isn't exactly recursive, is it? –  Sidar Jun 25 '12 at 8:38
    
No, it's not recursive. The point of the arg-list of swallow is that it binds to anything (we don't actually do anything with the args, as you can see, the whole call will be optimized out). It's just a simple way to expand template-parameter packs in certain situations. –  mitchnull Jun 25 '12 at 8:51
    
I'm not fully getting the concept behind it. But thanks for your input anyways. I've already solved my problem so far. Later on I might come back to this. –  Sidar Jun 25 '12 at 8:59

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