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I want to define a generic function for printing contents of std::map like types. My initial attempt is a function like this:

template <class K, class V>
inline void PrintCollection(const std::map<K,V>& map,
                            const char* separator="\n",
                            const char* arrow="->",
                            const char* optcstr="") {
  typedef typename std::map<K,V>::const_iterator iter_type;
  std::cout << optcstr;
  for (iter_type begin = map.begin(), it = begin, end = map.end();
       it != end; ++it) {
    if (it != begin) {
      std::cout << separator;
    }
    std::cout << it->first << arrow << it->second;
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

which works fine. When I try to generalize this function one more step, i.e. make it work for std::multimap type, compiler becomes angry. I tried several ways to make std::map generic in the function definition, such as:

template <class M, class K, class V>
inline void PrintCollection(const M<K,V>& map,
                            const char* separator="\n",
                            const char* arrow="->",
                            const char* optcstr="") {
  typedef typename M<K,V>::const_iterator iter_type;
  std::cout << optcstr;
  for (iter_type begin = map.begin(), it = begin, end = map.end();
       it != end; ++it) {
    if (it != begin) {
      std::cout << separator;
    }
    std::cout << it->first << arrow << it->second;
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

with no success.

How can I generalize this function as I defined above?

To be more clear, I have already a function defined for vector-like classes defined before this function. It is like

template <class T>
inline void PrintCollection(const T& collection,
                            const char* separator="\n",
                            const char* optcstr="") {
  typedef typename T::const_iterator iter_type;

  std::cout << optcstr;

  for (iter_type begin = collection.begin(), it = begin, end = collection.end();
       it != end;
       ++it) {
    if (it != begin) {
      std::cout << separator;
    }
    std::cout << *it;
  }

  std::cout << std::endl;
}

So what I want to achieve it to make this function specialized to map-like classes. I'm pretty new in C++, so I don't know the exact term for this kind of stuff. Is this called "template specialization"?

share|improve this question

Do it like the stdlib does and use iterators in your algorithm interfaces. This is the most generic solution.

template<class Iter>
void PrintCollection(Iter first, Iter last,
                     const char* separator="\n",
                     const char* arrow="->",
                     const char* optcstr="") 
{
    typedef Iter iter_type;
    std::cout << optcstr;
    for (iter_type begin = first, it = begin, end = last;
        it != end; ++it) {
    if (it != begin) {
        std::cout << separator;
    }
    std::cout << it->first << arrow << it->second;
    }
    std::cout << std::endl;
}


int main()
{
    vector<pair<int, int>> collection;
    map<int, int> collection2;
    pair<int, int> collection3[3];

    PrintCollection(begin(collection), end(collection));
    PrintCollection(begin(collection2), end(collection2));
    PrintCollection(begin(collection3), end(collection3));
}
share|improve this answer

The answer is fairly simple.

There is no dependency on typenames K and V in the function. So remove them and make a general template. It can be used for both map and multimap:

template <class AnyMap>
void PrintCollection(const AnyMap& map,
  ...
{
  typedef typename AnyMap::const_iterator iter_type;

On side note, with templates, you don't need inline keyword.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to write this PrintCollection function work for any container type, such as for std::vector, etc. So the code I pasted was actually a template specialization for map-like classes. Before that, I have another function which fors for sequential containers. – Haldun Jun 25 '12 at 6:52
    
@Haldun, all containers don't have first and second data member inside them. If you remove the code specific to that, my solution will work for any container. Here is a demo for map/multimap. – iammilind Jun 25 '12 at 6:54

You could use a template-template parameter

template<template<class, class> class M, class K, class V>
inline void PrintCollection(const M<K, V>& map, /* rest as before */)
{
    // rest as before
}

int main()
{
    std::map<int, int> m1;
    std::multi_map<int, int> m2;

    // fill both maps

    PrintCollection(m1);
    PrintCollection(m2);
}

But as hansmaad is pointing out, you could also use a pair of iterators instead of the container as parameter. In general, you would prefer that solution if your PrintCollection is very generic and does not make use of the fact that it has a Key and Value type. OTOH, if your PrintCollection also needs to print that information in some future version, then you might want to use a template-template parameter that takes those two types as parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
A map has actually four template parameters, some of which are defaulted. – Bo Persson Jun 25 '12 at 6:46
    
@BoPersson Good point. It could be worked around with a template alias probably, but maybe not worth the trouble. – TemplateRex Jun 25 '12 at 6:49

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