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I have two functions:

def f(a,b,c=g(b)):
    blabla

def g(n):
    blabla

c is an optional argument in function f. If the user does not specify its value, the program should compute g(b) and that would be the value of c. But the code does not compile - it says name 'b' is not defined. How to fix that?

Someone suggested:

def g(b):
    blabla

def f(a,b,c=None):
    if c is None:
        c = g(b)
    blabla

But this doesn't work. Maybe the user intended c to be None and then c will have another value.

share|improve this question
2  
None is a Python object. None is not the string 'None'. You asked if c is not filled out (meaning None) for it to be g(b). The answer given was exactly right. Because the only way a user could specify None would be to give no 3rd argument, which was your question. –  jonwd7 Jul 13 '09 at 10:30
1  
What do you mean? I can't pass None as an argument? The absence of an object is not equivalent to it being set to None. For example: type() gives an error, but type(None) == 'NoneType' –  ooboo Jul 13 '09 at 10:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted
def f(a,b,c=None):
    if c is None:
        c = g(b)

If None can be a valid value for c then you do this:

sentinel = object()
def f(a,b,c=sentinel):
    if c is sentinel:
        c = g(b)
share|improve this answer
    
sorry, this is not a good solution. Maybe the user want's c value to be None? and then c will be set to something else by the function g(b) even though that was not the user's intention –  ooboo Jul 13 '09 at 10:18
4  
Then you're into trouble: docs.python.org/reference/… You should re-consider your design or read a good Python book. –  Boldewyn Jul 13 '09 at 10:33
    
I will give you an example. Suppose b is a big number and g(b) calculates its factors. Suppose, further, that for convinience we don't count the number itself and 1 as factors, so effectively the factorization of a prime number evaluates to None. c is an optional argument for the user to specify if he already knows the factorization. Then why call g(b) which could potentially be very expensive? –  ooboo Jul 13 '09 at 10:59
    
@ooboo: if you read my answer it is explained there, that in your approach g(b) will always be evaluated at compilation time. Always. Have a look at my example and try print(a) inside def g. It will print it even if test function is not called. –  SilentGhost Jul 13 '09 at 11:04
    
You are completely correct, I got it all messed up because of the None example. Originally I simply meant for c to be the index of a particular element in the list b. If the user knows it, no point to calculate it. –  ooboo Jul 13 '09 at 11:11

You cannot do it that way.

Inside the function, check if c is specified. If not, do the calculation.

def f(a,b,c=None):
    if c == None:
        c = g(b)
    blabla
share|improve this answer
3  
c is None is faster than c == None –  Paolo Bergantino Jul 13 '09 at 9:29
1  
It's true that 'is None' is faster than '== None', but the more important reason 'is None' is preferred is that it's more robust. The equality operator can be overridden such that objects which are not None can still compare equal to None. The proper test for None is debated constantly on comp.lang.python. Unless you really know what you're doing, use 'is'. –  John Y Jul 13 '09 at 19:57
    
Hey Paolo. Can you explain why c is None is faster than c == None? Is that inherent to objects or should I use 'is' when comparing numeric arguments, too? Thanks! –  ooboo Jul 14 '09 at 13:00
    
@ooboo: You should definitely NOT use 'is' for comparing numbers! The point of 'is' is to check whether two names refer to the same object. Effectively, it's a pointer comparison. This makes it fast, but inappropriate for numbers and strings, which (in Python) can have multiple copies (i.e. different object instances) that have the same value. –  John Y Jul 19 '09 at 18:42

value of c will be evaluated (g(b)) at compilation time. You need g defined before f therefore. And of course you need a global b variable to be defined at that stage too.

b = 4

def g(a):
    return a+1

def test(a, c=g(b)):
    print(c)

test(b)

prints 5.

share|improve this answer
    
It highlights that the problem is not having a function as default value but having b undefined for the that function –  luc Jul 13 '09 at 9:41
    
Here b is a global variable... in my example it's not –  ooboo Jul 13 '09 at 11:17
    
well it won't work then! b needs to exist at compilation time, when g(b) is evaluated! –  SilentGhost Jul 13 '09 at 11:24

The problem with

sentinel = object()
def f(a, b, c=sentinel):
  if c is sentinel:
    c = g(b)

is that sentinel is global/public unless this code is part of a function/method. So someone might still be able to call f(23, 42, sentinel). However, if f is global/public, you can use a closure to make sentinel local/private so that the caller cannot use it:

def f():
  sentinel = object()
  def tmp(a, b, c=sentinel):
    if c is sentinel:
      c = g(b)
  return tmp
f = f()

If you are concerned that static code analyzers could get the wrong idea about f then, you can use the same parameters for the factory:

def f(a, b, c=object()): #@UnusedVariable
  sentinel = object()
  def tmp(a, b, c=sentinel):
    if c is sentinel:
      c = g(b)
  return tmp
f = f(23, 42)
share|improve this answer
def f(a,b,*args):
    if len(args) == 1:
        c = args[0]
    elif len(args) == 0:
        c = g(b)
    else:
        raise Exception('Function takes 2 or 3 parameters only.')
    blabla

def g(n):
    blabla

You can probably structure it better, but that's the main idea. Alternatively you can use **kwargs and use the function like f(a,b,c=Something), you just have to modify f accordingly.

Documentation

share|improve this answer
    
SilentGhost fixed it, and Thanks to him for that. Sorry I was rushing to lunch so it came out ugly and with mistakes. But it's a working solution and Paolo Bergantino solution would break if I actually wanted to pass 'sentinel' as argument c and 'sentinel' is extra variable in the namespace now. –  Maiku Mori Jul 13 '09 at 11:01
1  
@Maiku Mon: The whole point of sentinel is that it's NOT a normal value for c, it's a special value that means 'please calculate c = g(b) for me; you don't "want" to pass it as a normal value of c. –  John Machin Jul 13 '09 at 11:52
    
@John, the problem can be solved this way. The OP has c pre-calculated. So if he passes it to f he doesn't want it to be calculated again. If he doesn't pass it, than it needs to be calculated. –  SilentGhost Jul 13 '09 at 12:01
    
@John, I understand how it works. The first part of my argument is probably meaningless since chances are no one will ever use 'sentinel' as parameter, but I still don't like it. It's just my biased opinion. –  Maiku Mori Jul 13 '09 at 12:57

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