Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We work with MySQL 5.6.5-m8 dev version.
When we tried to dump the database we got the following error:

user@ubuntu-11:~$ mysqldump -u root -p my_schema > dump.sql
Enter password:
mysqldump: Couldn't execute 'SET OPTION SQL_QUOTE_SHOW_CREATE=1': You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'OPTION SQL_QUOTE_SHOW_CREATE=1' at line 1 (1064)

Can anyone advice on the problem?

share|improve this question
    
Run it with --force and check the output for errors. –  Burhan Khalid Jun 25 '12 at 7:00
    
This didb't clarify the problem. When running with --force, I started to get the same problem almost every 1-2 seconds with the following output: mysqldump: Couldn't execute 'SET OPTION SQL_QUOTE_SHOW_CREATE=1': You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'OPTION SQL_QUOTE_SHOW_CREATE=1' at line 1 (1064) –  user1479191 Jun 26 '12 at 6:25
    
Is the DB corrupt? –  Burhan Khalid Jun 26 '12 at 6:33

6 Answers 6

MySQL 5.6 discontinued and removed support for SET OPTION syntax, but even the newest mysqldump 5.5.30 (at the time of writing) still generates SET OPTION. In other words, mysqldump 5.5 can't dump from MySQL 5.6 servers.

See: http://bugs.mysql.com/bug.php?id=67507

The original question might have been an interim problem with 5.6.5-m8, but I thought people who find this question could use the information.

share|improve this answer

I had this problem. It turns out the mysqldump client I was using was several versions behind the server and was using an outmoded syntax. Check to see if you've got older binaries that are earlier in your path - maybe in /usr/bin/ - and look for newer ones in the same location as the currently executing mysql binary - possibly /usr/local/mysql.

share|improve this answer

Got the same error. I had binaries in /usr/bin left over from a previous MySQL 5.1 installation. I verified that the binaries were also in my MySQL 5.6 bin folder, and then I blew away the /usr/bin versions. After doing that, mysqldump ran normally.

share|improve this answer

If you're in a situation where you can't upgrade mySQL (or touch the existing tools), try this approach:

  • Find mysqldump (mine is at /usr/bin/mysqldump)
  • Get a copy of it and throw it into a hex editor (I used HxD)
  • Find "SET OPTION SQL_QUOTE_SHOW_CREATE" as a plain text (ANSI, 1-byte-per-char) string, and blank out the "OPTION" bytes with spaces (0x20 in hex)
  • Use this modified version of mysqldump instead!

Then, pretend that you didn't just solve the problem with a gritty hack, and try to forget about it on your way to get some more coffee. It's been working for a few months for me!

share|improve this answer
    
Hate to admit it, but when having no access to update mysqldump and just needing to do it one time, this actually worked. Now all that is left is drinking coffee until I forget, or forgive myself :) –  Niklas B Apr 2 '14 at 7:45

Workbench is not installed in the same place as MYSQL. Workbench is installed with it's OWN copy of sqldump IN ADDITION to the copy that is installed with MySQL.

WORKBENCH "C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Workbench CE 5.2.47\sqldump.exe" = 5.5.16 MYSQL "C:\Program Files\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\bin\sqldump.exe" = 5.6.10.

I copied the MYSQL version over to my workbench directory and now everything works fine :)

Hope this helps! Here is the Link

share|improve this answer

+1 for Burhan Khalid's answer

Run it with --force, output it to a dbdump.sql, edit it for any incompatible statements.

workaround command example:

mysqldump -uusername --ppassword --force dbname > dbdump.sql

edit your dbdump.sql to fix any incompatible statement across mysql versions. For me it was timestamp expression: from 5.6 default 'CURRENT_TIMESTAMP' to default CURRENT_TIMESTAMP in 5.5.

then import dbdump.sql or do whatever you need to do with it is fine.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.