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I was refactoring some code and found there are two places that can be written with the same code except the comparator of a set is less<double> in one place and greater<double> in the other. Something like:

double MyClass::Function1(double val)
{
    std::set<double, less<double> > s;
    // Do something with s
}

double MyClass::Function2(double val)
{
    std::set<double, greater<double> > s;
    // Do the same thing with s as in Function1
}

So I thought of doing:

double MyClass::GeneralFunction(double val, bool condition)
{  
    if(condition)  
    {  
        // Select greater as comparator  
    }  
    else
    {  
        // Select less as comparator  
    }  

    set<double, comparator> s;  
    // common code
}

I've made it work by using my custom comparator functions, like this:

bool my_greater(double lhs, double rhs)
{
    return lhs > rhs;
}

bool my_less(double lhs, double rhs)
{
    return lhs < rhs;
}

double MyClass::GeneralFunction(double val, bool condition)
{ 
    typedef bool(*Comparator) ( double,  double);
    Comparator comp = &my_less;
    if (condition)
    {
        comp = &my_greater;
    }

    std::set<double, Comparator > s(comp);  

    //....
}

But I would like to use the built-in ones. The problem is I don't know how to declare the comparator and assign it the built in predicates.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Do you really need a runtime check?

template <class Comp> double MyClass::Function(double val)
{
    std::set<double, Comp > s;
    // Do something with s
}

Even if you do, you can still use

double MyClass::Function(double val, bool comp)
{
   return comp ? Function<std::less<double> >(val) : Function<std::greater<double> >(val);
}
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Thanks! I didn't really need the runtime check, so I could select the comparator in the caller. –  MikMik Jun 27 '12 at 11:59
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The problem is that you cannot choose the type of the comparator at tuntime, and std::less and std::greater have unrelated types. Similarly, an std::set instantiated with std::less as a comparator has a type unrelated to on instantiated with std::greater. There are several possible solutions, but the simplest (and the only one not involving inhertance, virtual functions and dynamic allocation) is along the lines of what you are doing:

class SelectableCompare
{
    bool myIsGreater;
public:
    SelectableCompare( bool isGreater ) : myIsGreater( isGreater ) {}
    bool operator()( double d1, double d2 ) const
    {
        static std::less<double> const less;
        return myIsGreater
            ? less( d2, d1 )
            : less( d1, d2 );
    }
};

I've used the standard std::less and std::greater because you expressed an interest in doing so. In the case of double, this is, frankly, overkill; I'd normally just write d1 > d2 and d1 < d2. A templated version of the above, however, might make sense, since some types might have a specialized std::less. This is also why I only use std::less; it's quite conceivable that a programmer specialize only std::less, with the knowledge that this is the only one used for ordering in the standard library.

Just to be complete: the obvious alternative is to use the strategy pattern in the comparator, with an abstract comparator base:

class Comparator
{
public:
    virtual ~Comparator() {}
    virtual bool isLessThan( double d1, double d2 ) const = 0;
};

, the rather obvious derived classes for the different comparisons, and a wrapper to manage the memory:

class ComparatorWrapper
{
    std::shared_ptr<Comparator> myComparator;
public:
    ComparatorWrapper( Comparator* newed_comparator )
        : myComparator( newed_comparator )
    {
    }
    bool operator()( double d1, double d2 ) const
    {
        return myComparator->isLessThan( d1, d2 );
    }
};

This is definitely overkill for the binary choice you need, but might be appropriate if there were more choices; e.g. a set which might be sorted on one of many different fields (all of different types).

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Just use

std::set<double, std::function<bool(double,double)>>

as your set, and instantiate it like so:

typedef std::set<double, std::function<bool(double,double)> > RTSet;

RTSet choose_ordering(bool increasing)
{
    if (increasing)
        return RTSet( std::less<double>() );
    else
        return RTSet( std::greater<double>() );
}

Note in general your tradeoff is to either:

  • check ordering on every comparison, or
  • check it once at instantiation but then also incur an indirection on every function call (like a virtual function call for example)

I'm preferring the second option so you can't accidentally change the ordering while a set is in use, breaking all its invariants.


Just a quick thought, as this could potentially be a separate answer (and even question), but you mention two bits of code are identical except for sort order.

An alternative I've used in some situations, is to use a single sort direction, and template the code operating on the set (by iterator type), so you can do

if (increasing)
    do_stuff(set.begin(), set.end());
else
    do_stuff(set.rbegin(), set.rend());
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+1 for the use of std::function. With regards to the risk of accidentally changing the ordering while the set is in use: any flag should be a private member of a functional object, which reduces the risk enormously. –  James Kanze Jun 25 '12 at 8:40
    
The std::function part was what I was actually asking, but MSalters' answer was a better solution, I think. –  MikMik Jun 27 '12 at 12:01
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Why not do

template <typename Compare>
double MyClass::GeneralFunction(double val)
{
    std::set<double, Compare> s;

    //....
}

Template selection by formal parameter is not something C++ handles very well. Push as much as possible into the compilation phase by having the caller supply the template argument.

Then you can provide a wrapper, if you really want to select one at runtime:

double MyClass::GeneralFunction(double val, bool condition)
{
    return condition ?
        GeneralFunction<std::greater<double> >(val) :
        GeneralFunction<std::less   <double> >(val);\
}
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