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Do I need to expect problems when I add XML elements from a different namespace to an XSLT file? Or are they just ignored (as would be great)?

Background: In a large project, the user can use user-defined tags for text formatting and so on (e.g. \textbf{bold}. They are first transformed to a specific dialect in XML (first using a proprietary tool and then XSLT) and afterwards possibly converted to other dialects such as latex, framemaker, BB code, ...

For this reason there are currently the following files:

  1. Config file for the proprietary tool which translates \textbf{bold} to <Cmd Name="strong"><param Nr="1">bold</param></Cmd>
  2. XSLT file which translates the XML code above to <myns:strong>bold</myns:strong>
  3. An XSD file describing the allowed tags and formats
  4. Multiple xsl files for translating <myns:strong>bold</myns:strong> to different output formats (e.g. back to \textbf{bold})

Maintaining these files is very difficult because there is no real 1:1 mapping and adding a new command requires changing multiple files in the right way.

Therefore my idea would be to merge these. E.g. a single XML file would contain:

<!-- config file for proprietary tool -->
<repl:Cmd Name="strong"><repl:Param Nr="1"/></repl:Cmd>

<!-- converting to XML dialect -->
<xsl:template mode="Text" match="Cmd[@Name = 'textbf']">
   <myns:strong>
       <xsl:apply-templates select="Param[@Nr='1']" mode="Text"/>
   </myns:strong>
</xsl:template>

<!-- XSD schema for validating XML -->
<xsd:element name="strong" type="tns:GenericTextType">
</xsd:element>

<!-- converting XML dialect to latex code -->
<xsl:template match="myns:strong" mode="Text_toLatex">
    <xsl:text disable-output-escaping="yes">\textbf{</xsl:text>
       <xsl:apply-templates mode="Text_toLatex"/>
    <xsl:text disable-output-escaping="yes">}</xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

which would be much easier to maintain.

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1  
Technically you can do this, if I understood you correctly. I'm not sure if it's a good idea though. You would go from "have to change multiple small files in the right way" to "have to change one single big file in the right way". I don't consider this very much of a gain. You'd mix stuff that should be self-contained because it is (or should be) orthogonal. Plus you'd lose granularity in source control. –  Tomalak Jun 25 '12 at 8:58
1  
Also, how do you intend to use <repl:Cmd> and <xsd:element> in your "big" XSLT file? And how does your "proprietary tool" fit into all of this? –  Tomalak Jun 25 '12 at 9:00
    
Thank you for this comment! First, you are right, it is maybe not the best way. But I think it is indeed a gain: Suppose I want to add a "\textit". Then I need to change 4 files and it is very difficult to keep them in sync. When I had one file, I could group by commands, rather than by file type. In the large file, I would have a section for each command and thus easier to track. Nevertheless: Do you have a better solution for me? Currently I'm trying to generate the files from the xsl file via xslt but this is also not the best solution ... –  divB Jun 25 '12 at 10:57
    
@2nd comment: Input is an XML file like: <desc>This is \textbf{bold}</desc>. The proprietary tool replaces this by <desc>This is <Cmd><Param Nr="1">bold</Param></Cmd></desc>. This is processed by xslt. So the propriety tool would just extract the <repl:Cmd> elements from the xslt file –  divB Jun 25 '12 at 11:00
1  
I suspected that. So effectively you'd be storing information in an XSLT program that is never going to be used by that XSLT program. Not very… clean, if you ask me. You should think about keeping separate files that do separate things. If you need to change four file to cope with \textit than you're doing a bad job at decoupling and abstraction. You should at maximum only have to change one file, namely the file that gives \textit tokens some meaning. The following processing chain should remain operational without change. –  Tomalak Jun 25 '12 at 11:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Do I need to expect problems when I add XML elements from a different namespace to an XSLT file? Or are they just ignored (as would be great)?

There will be no problems. XSLT programs are regular XML documents, you can generally add any elements you like (namespace or not) to the document and they become part of the program.

Note that you can use elements with a namespace everywhere, but elements without a namespace cannot be children of <xsl:stylesheet>.

If they are children of an <xsl:template>, they will be output into the result. If they are children of the <xsl:stylesheet> itself, they are not output (i.e., they are "ignored").

All you must do is

  • declare the used namespaces so your XSLT stays well-formed (this is a basic XML requirement, you always must declare namespaces you use)
  • prevent the output of unneeded namespaces into the result document using the exclude-result-prefixes directive.

.

<xsl:stylesheet 
  version="1.0" 
  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
  xmlns:repl="http//tempuri.org/repl"
  xmlns:tns="http//tempuri.org/tns"
  xmlns:myns="http//tempuri.org/myns"
  xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema"
  exclude-result-prefixes="tns myns"
> 
  <!-- config file for proprietary tool -->
  <repl:Cmd Name="strong"><repl:Param Nr="1"/></repl:Cmd>

  <!-- converting to XML dialect -->
  <xsl:template mode="Text" match="Cmd[@Name = 'textbf']">
    <myns:strong>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="Param[@Nr='1']" mode="Text"/>
    </myns:strong>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- XSD schema for validating XML -->
  <xsd:element name="strong" type="tns:GenericTextType">
  </xsd:element>

  <!-- converting XML dialect to latex code -->
  <xsl:template match="myns:strong" mode="Text_toLatex">
    <xsl:text>\textbf{</xsl:text>
      <xsl:apply-templates mode="Text_toLatex"/>
    <xsl:text>}</xsl:text>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Nothing will happen with <repl:Cmd> and <xsd:element> unless you write XSLT code that explicitly uses these nodes. They will be accessible through XPath like document('')/*/xsd:element (the * is a short-cut for xsl:stylesheet).

In fact this is a common technique to store additional structured data – like configuration or look-up tables – in an XSLT document.


Side note: You generally should not use disable-output-escaping. In your particular code it's even superfluous.

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Hi,thanks a lot, this is indeed the technical solution to my problem. However, do you have a "generic" solution? Maybe it's better to generate the files from the xsl file or so? –  divB Jun 25 '12 at 11:02
1  
@divB You could think about creating a more complex config XML that your external parser understands and that you also can use to create XSD from (via a separate XSLT program). It would be a matter of changing one file and running it though XSLT to generate a new schema. Maybe the config could even contain information on how to generate HTML or LaTeX for any given token so your formatting XSLT can use it as input. You'd still have to change only one file to accommodate new formats. –  Tomalak Jun 25 '12 at 11:30
    
Thanks, I will go for this. My concept would be to easily define the elements where complexer structures can be overwritten by manual overriding actions. Is there anything wrong with embedding XSL and XSD fragments is such a config file and build up the common files using the fragments? –  divB Jun 25 '12 at 12:42
1  
@divB No, I'd say this is okay. The alternative would be to invent some kind of XML meta-dialect that describes XSD-files and an XSLT file that translates those descriptions to XSD. I would hesitate to go down that route and use building blocks instead. –  Tomalak Jun 25 '12 at 13:13

An element from a namespace other than the XSLT namespace, appearing as a child of the xsl:stylesheet element, is ignored unless it happens to be a namespace recognized by the XSLT processor, for example the Saxon processor attaches special meaning to elements in the namespace http://saxon.sf.net/.

An element that is not in any namespace, however, is an error.

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