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import Image
import os
for dirname,dirs,files in os.walk("."):
    for filename in files:
        try:
            im = Image.open(os.path.join(dirname,filename));
        except IOError:
            print "error opening file :: "  + os.path.join(dirname,filename)
        print im.size

Here i'm trying to print the size of all the files in directory (and sub). But i know im is outside the scope when in the line im.size. but how else do i do it without using else or finally blocks.

The following error is shown:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "batch.py", line 13, in <module>
    print im.size
NameError: name 'im' is not defined
share|improve this question
14  
im's scope is not limited to the try block; this is not C++. – cdhowie Jun 25 '12 at 8:36
    
@cdhowie: in that case, why the above error? – shahalpk Jun 25 '12 at 8:40
6  
The error is shown because the variable im is not defined successfully if the Image.open fails hence it not existing when you try and access the .size attribute. – Christian Witts Jun 25 '12 at 8:41
1  
Because your except block "falls through" to the below code. If an exception is thrown on the first iteration of the for loop, im will not yet have been assigned to and therefore will not exist. You need to add continue so that the error is handled by repeating the loop on the next item. – cdhowie Jun 25 '12 at 8:42
    
Or just put im.size just after its assignment in the try block. – RickyA Apr 4 '13 at 14:34
up vote 13 down vote accepted

What's wrong with the "else" clause ?

for filename in files:
    try:
        im = Image.open(os.path.join(dirname,filename))
    except IOError, e:
        print "error opening file :: %s : %s" % (os.path.join(dirname,filename), e)
    else:
        print im.size

Now since you're in a loop, you can also use a "continue" statement:

for filename in files:
    try:
        im = Image.open(os.path.join(dirname,filename))
    except IOError, e:
        print "error opening file :: %s : %s" % (os.path.join(dirname,filename), e)
        continue

    print im.size
share|improve this answer

If you can't open the file as an image, and only want to work on valid images, then include a continue statement in your except block which will take you to the next iteration of your for loop.

try:
    im = Image.open(os.path.join(dirname, filename))
except IOError:
    print 'error opening file :: ' + os.path.join(dirname, filename)
    continue
share|improve this answer
    
tats not my question. but i gotta tell u, it works even without the continue statement. – shahalpk Jun 25 '12 at 8:39
1  
@ShahalTharique Your question is flawed, because you assume that im's scope is limited to the try block, when in fact it is not. – cdhowie Jun 25 '12 at 8:40
1  
The continue is there so that if you have not successfully opened the image it will continue on to the next file in your for loop as you will not have an object called im created and therefore will not have access to its attributes and methods. – Christian Witts Jun 25 '12 at 8:43
import Image
import os
for dirname,dirs,files in os.walk("."):
    for filename in files:
        try:
            im = Image.open(os.path.join(dirname,filename))
            print im.size
        except IOError:
            print "error opening file :: "  + os.path.join(dirname,filename)

Also, no ; in Python.

share|improve this answer
    
i want to code further, but i dont want it inside the try block. any ideas? – shahalpk Jun 25 '12 at 8:37
2  
@ShahalTharique The problem is that your except block does not branch somewhere, so it executes and then the print statement does. Since the exception was thrown, im was never assigned to. You need to handle the error by going to the next item (continue) or by leaving the for loop (break). – cdhowie Jun 25 '12 at 8:39
    
@Burhan tat makes sense. thanks. – shahalpk Jun 25 '12 at 8:41
    
-1 because writing more than the minimal amount of code inside a try can mask bugs. – lvc Jun 25 '12 at 9:06

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