Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a safe way to rename an old commit (no branching occured in the meantime) that is some five or six commits down the road from the current tip?

share|improve this question
1  
What do you mean "rename"? Commits don't have names to change. –  Paul S Jun 27 '12 at 16:02
    
@PaulS - No need to be overly pedantic. I seriously thought that phrasing would be clear to everyone. How to change the log message, if you wish. –  ldigas Jun 27 '12 at 18:24
    
Not trying to be pedantic, just wasn't sure what you wanted to do. You could have been talking about the branch name for example, and you have an answer that tells you how to change the branch name. It wasn't just me who misunderstood. –  Paul S Jun 28 '12 at 14:11
    
@PaulS - Yes, but since I even wrote "no branching occured ..." I thought it was obvious that I'm able to differentiate between branch names and regular commits. –  ldigas Jun 30 '12 at 8:23
    
In any case, misunderstanding solved so we might as well EOD this. –  ldigas Jun 30 '12 at 8:24
add comment

2 Answers

It depends on whether you did already push this commit to a public repo, or cointains merges. When the commit is already public visible, there is no way to change the commit afterwards. Also the may MQ works does not allow to edit merge commits afterwards.

When the commit is not public visible, then you can import all commits to a MQ (enable the mq extension and call hg qimport -r»Revision« for each revision where your commit is an ancestor). Then you unapply all patches with hg qpop --all. Afterwards you can change the branch name with hg branch »name«, which you also need to call, when the commit did introduce a new branch name (after the qpop the branch name of the ancestor of your commit will be used for the next qpush commands if no branch name is explicit set). When you want to edit the commit message, you can do so by hg qpush && hg qrefresh -e. To finish the editing, you call hg qpush --all && hg qfinish --applied.

EDIT: sample workflow

Say this is initial state, and you want to edit 4:

8 [default] (tip)
|
7
|
6
|
5
|
4
|
3
|
2
|
1
|
0

Now you import all Revisions, including 4, into the mercurial queues with hg qimport -r 4:8, now you have the following history:

8 [default] (8.diff, qtip, tip)
|
7 (7.diff)
|
6 (6.diff)
|
5 (5.diff)
|
4 (4.diff, qbase)
|
3 (qparent)
|
2
|
1
|
0

the next step is to unapply all patches: hg qpop --all

3 [default] (tip)
|
2
|
1
|
0

Don't panic, your history is not gone, it is still there in .hg/patches. Now the branch name can be set with hg branch newbranch. This is not visible in the history, until a new commit is created. But the branch name can be displayed with hg branch.

Now the first frozen commit can re-applied with hg qpush:

4 [newbranch] (4.diff, qbase, qtip, tip)
|
3 [default] (qparent)
|
2
|
1
|
0

Now you can reword the commit message with hg qrefresh --edit. You can also change the content by editing some files in your working copy. So if you only want to change the commit message, make sure that you did not modify any files in your working copy prior to call hg qrefresh. You can check this if you run hg status before calling hg qrefresh.

  4 [newbranch] (4.diff, qbase, qtip, tip) {new commit message}
 /
3 [default] (qparent)
|
2
|
1
|
0

You can edit further commits, by navigation to each one with hg qpush and hg qpop. When you are done, you need to convert your patches back info regular revisions. This is done by applying all patches, and finish the queue. This is done by hg qpush --all, followed by an `hg qfinish --all. now the history looks like this:

  8 [newbranch] (tip)
  |
  7
  |
  6
  |
  5
  |
  4 {new commit message}
 /
3 [default]
|
2
|
1
|
0
share|improve this answer
    
+1 It's just my local offline repo, of a personal project. No merging, branching or anything occured in the meantime, nor has it been pushed anywhere. Would it be too much to ask to just give me a simple case as to what I would have to do to rename it? I haven't understood, unfortunatelly, half of the above - but then again, I use hg in a rather simple way. –  ldigas Jun 25 '12 at 13:03
add comment

Since this is a private repo that hasn't been pushed anywhere, it should be perfectly safe to edit history. (Note that in the general case, history editing isn't a viable option. It only applies if the repo hasn't been published.)

There are plenty of Mercurial extensions to permit editing history, mq being one of them. However, the histedit extension is probably easier in your case. It's not included with Mercurial but may be installed fairly easily from http://mercurial.selenic.com/wiki/HisteditExtension.

Once it's set up:

$ hg histedit -r $ID_OF_THE_CHANGESET_YOU_WANT_TO_EDIT

This will open up whichever text editor you normally use for hg commit, with a list of changesets; this list includes every changeset after the one you specified, so scroll to the bottom. You'll see something like this for each changeset:

pick 2d5657b340e5 The original message for that commit

For the changeset you need to modify, change pick to edit. Then save and quit. Back at the shell prompt, do:

$ hg histedit --continue

And you'll be prompted for the new commit message, as usual.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.