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I use only C99, and, yesterday, I heard that it was impossible to mix several declarations and initializations in ANSI C. Thus, codes like this :

unsigned x = 42, y = 21;
double e = 3.14;

Would be, with gcc' -pedantic flag :

unsigned x, y;
double e;

x = 42, y = 21;
e = 3.14;

I'm surprised, because I didn't find any information about that in C89 draft, and a code like this works fine...

unsigned x = 42, y = 21;
double e = 3.14;

Sorry, it seems to be a trivial question, but I did some research, and nothing told me about this rule... Is it true ?

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I get no error from c99 -Wall -pedantic. –  larsmans Jun 25 '12 at 9:18
    
Me too. But he told me that with -ansi -pedantic -pedantic-errors he had some errors. –  user1479481 Jun 25 '12 at 9:21
    
@Lucas Pesenti Who told you that ? –  nos Jun 25 '12 at 9:24
    
@LucasPesenti "Some errors"? Wow. Good for you. Will you keep them secret, or will you integrate them in your answer in order to let us know about them? –  glglgl Jun 25 '12 at 9:25
    
Sorry, he didn't tell me those errors. I will ask him... I thought that the draft would be sufficient. –  user1479481 Jun 25 '12 at 9:26

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An initialization is a part of declaration, so you can do initialization in a declaration in both C89/C99:

/* Valid in C89 and C99. There are no statement, only declarations */
unsigned x = 42, y = 21;
double e = 3.14;

What you cannot do is to mix statements and declarations in C89:

/* Not valid in C89, valid in C99: mixing declarations and statements */
unsigned x, y;
x = 42, y = 21;

double e;
e = 3.14;
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Ok, so it seems to be valid. Thanks, I gonna think about that. –  user1479481 Jun 25 '12 at 9:30

Actually, I'm using your first syntax with -pedantic flag and it works well, without any warning. As far as I know, you can't mix your code like this:

int i;
i = 2;
int j;
j = 2;

This is because, in C semantic, every program is a block and a block is a couple [declarations, commands]. But declaration include initialization of variables as well.

Every time you open a new block, for example with a while or an if, you'll have a second block, and again you can have a declaration part, and a command one.

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