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I'm working on linux but multithreading and single threading both are taking 340ms. Can someone tell me what's wrong with what I'm doing?

Here is my code

#include<time.h>
#include<fstream>
#define SIZE_OF_ARRAY 1000000
using namespace std;

struct parameter
{
        int *data;
        int left;
        int right;
};
void readData(int *data)
{
        fstream iFile("Data.txt");
        for(int i = 0; i < SIZE_OF_ARRAY; i++)
                iFile>>data[i];
}

int threadCount = 4;

int Partition(int *data, int left, int right)
{
        int i = left, j = right, temp;
        int pivot = data[(left + right) / 2];
        while(i <= j)
        {
                while(data[i] < pivot)
                        i++;
                while(data[j] > pivot)
                        j--;
                if(i <= j)
                {
                        temp = data[i];
                        data[i] = data[j];
                        data[j] = temp;
                        i++;
                        j--;
                }
        }
        return i;
}

void QuickSort(int *data, int left, int right)
{
        int index = Partition(data, left, right);
        if(left < index - 1)
                QuickSort(data, left, index - 1);
        if(index < right)
                QuickSort(data, index + 1, right);
}

//Multi threading code starts from here
void *Sort(void *param)
{
        parameter *param1 = (parameter *)param;
        QuickSort(param1->data, param1->left, param1->right);
        pthread_exit(NULL);
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        clock_t start, diff;
        int *data = new int[SIZE_OF_ARRAY];
        pthread_t threadID, threadID1;
        pthread_attr_t attr;
        pthread_attr_init(&attr);
        pthread_attr_setdetachstate(&attr, PTHREAD_CREATE_JOINABLE);
        pthread_attr_setscope(&attr, PTHREAD_SCOPE_SYSTEM);
        parameter param, param1;
        readData(data);
        start = clock();
        int index = Partition(data, 0, SIZE_OF_ARRAY - 1);
        if(0 < index - 1)
        {
                param.data = data;
                param.left = 0;
                param.right = index - 1;
                pthread_create(&threadID, NULL, Sort, (void *)&param);
        }
        if(index < SIZE_OF_ARRAY - 1)
        {
                param1.data = data;
                param1.left = index + 1;
                param1.right = SIZE_OF_ARRAY;
                pthread_create(&threadID1, NULL, Sort, (void *)&param1);
        }
        pthread_attr_destroy(&attr);
        pthread_join(threadID, NULL);
        pthread_join(threadID1, NULL);
        diff = clock() - start;
        cout<<"Sorting Time = "<<diff * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<"\n";
        delete []data;
        return 0;
}
//Multithreading Ends here

Single thread main function
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
        clock_t start, diff;
        int *data = new int[SIZE_OF_ARRAY];
        readData(data);
        start = clock();
        QuickSort(data, 0, SIZE_OF_ARRAY - 1);
        diff = clock() - start;
        cout<<"Sorting Time = "<<diff * 1000 / CLOCKS_PER_SEC<<"\n";
        delete []data;
        return 0;
}
//Single thread code ends here
some of functions single thread and multi thread use same
share|improve this question
    
How many CPUs does your computer have? –  jxh Jun 25 '12 at 10:00
    
Print the index variable in the main function. If you are extremely unlucky at choosing the pivot in the middle of the array, only one thread will be doing all the work, or the work will be split vary inequally. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 25 '12 at 10:05
    
syatem have 24 CPUs and array contains random number. –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 10:24
    
Can any body tell if i go with sched_setaffinity by forcing os to assign threads to different CPUs will it reduce the time taken by multi threading sorting –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 11:23

3 Answers 3

clock returns total CPU time, not wall time.

If you have 2 CPUs and 2 threads, then after a second of running both thread simultaneously clock will return CPU time of 2 seconds (the sum of CPU times of each thread).

So the result is totally expected. It does not matter how many CPUs you have, the total running time summed over all CPUs will be the same.

share|improve this answer
    
then i should i measure the time taken by the program not from the CPU. –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 10:55
    
You can measure wall time with e.g. gettimeofday. This will include all periods of inactivity (when CPUs are busy executing other processes), so you better do it on a system which has no extra processes running. –  n.m. Jun 25 '12 at 11:04
    
gettimeofday(&tv, NULL); start = (tv.tv_sec * 1000) + (tv.tv_usec * 0.001); QuickSort(data, 0, SIZE_OF_ARRAY - 1); gettimeofday(&tv, NULL); diff = start - (tv.tv_sec * 1000) + (tv.tv_usec * 0.001); –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 12:06
    
every time i execute the program it give different result with gettimeofday() why?????? –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 12:07
    
This is normal. There is always small variation in running time according to wall clock, due to variable load on the system and other factors. –  n.m. Jun 25 '12 at 12:36

Note that you call Partition once from the main thread...

The code works on the same memory block which prevents a CPU from working when the other accesses that same memory block. Unless your data is really large you're likely to have many such hits.

Finally, if your algorithm works at memory speed when you run it with one thread, adding more threads doesn't help. I did such tests a while back with image data, and having multiple thread decreased the total speed because the process was so memory intensive that both threads were fighting to access memory... and the result was worse than not having threads at all.

What makes really fast computers today go really is fast is running one very intensive process per computer, not a large number of threads (or processes) on a single computer.

share|improve this answer
    
if i decrese or increse the data size than also single and multi thread take equal time –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 10:29
    
And on multi thread some share memory concept is there than how share memory affect thrad allocation on different CPUs –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 10:30
    
quicksort doesn't work at the speed of memory, it's dramatically faster. –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 10:40
    
i want to know whether os is allocating diff CPU to diff thread or why execution time is same in case of single and multi thread. –  Mayank Kansal Jun 25 '12 at 10:41
    
As unkulunkulu says, the sort goes a lot faster than the memory can sustain. This means adding threads will not help. If you have a really complicated equation that reads a relatively small amount of data do very complex math and then writes the result, the having multiple threads can help. But just swapping two values hits the memory constantly and having multiple threads does not save you anything. –  Alexis Wilke Jun 25 '12 at 10:50

Build a thread pool with a producer-consumer queue with 24 threads hanging off it. Partition your data into two and issue a mergesort task object to the pool, the mergesort object should issue further pairs of mergesorts to the queue and wait on a signal for them to finish and so on until a mergersort object finds that it has [L1 cache-size data]. The object then qicksorts its data and signals completion to its parent task.

If that doesn't turn out to be blindingly quick on 24 cores, I'll stop posting about threads..

..and it will handle multiple sorts in parallel.

..and the pool can be used for other tasks.

.. and there is no No performance-destroying, deadlock-generating join(), synchronize(), (if you except the P-C queue, which only locks for long enough to push an object ref on), no thread-creation overhead and no dodgy thread-stopping/terminating/destroying code. Like the barbers, there is no waiting - as soon as a thread is finished with a task it can get another.

No thread micro-management, no tuning, (you could create 64 threads now, ready for the next generation of boxes). You could make the thread count tuneable - just add more threads at runtime, or delete some by queueing up poison-pills.

You don't need a reference to the threads at all - just set 'em off, (pass queue as parameter).

share|improve this answer
    
No need to revert to MergeSort, Just make a task for each "partition" step which returns two new tasks to the pool if they are larger than a given minimum size. To avoid flooding the pool (pun!), after partitioning, push the larger interval onto the pool and continue working on the smaller one. –  Pedro Jun 25 '12 at 13:25
    
@Pedro - there are variations, yes:) One I'd forgot is that, if an object has to wait on children, it should be stored in one child so that it's not blocking a thread - no hard waiting means no deadlocks. –  Martin James Jun 25 '12 at 13:46

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