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If the Doctype declares XHTML 1.0 Transitional then would this be acceptable?

<a href="" target="_self">
  <img src="" width="160" height="160" alt="" />
  <img src="" width="160" height="160" alt="" />
  <img src="" width="160" height="160" alt="" />
  <h1>Images</h1>
</a>

I seem to remember reading that if XHTML then <a></a> cannot contain block elements but I cannot locate this information again.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You have two different questions there:

Is hyperlinking multiple elements with a single “a” tag acceptable?

Yes it is, if the multiple elements combined form the description of the resource to which the hyperlink points.

Can you have block level elements validly inside a hyperlink in XHTML 1.0 Transitional?

No. However, it is valid in HTML5 if the parent of the <a> element permits block level elements inside it.

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Yes that's fine. Anchor tag's shouldn't contain divs, but images and text are fine.

Use http://validator.w3.org/check to validate your code, and it will detect the Doc type and inform you of any problems!

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It´s fine, but I would recommend against this. From a SEO perspective its best to have clean hyperlinks with clear descriptions. Now you have 4 elements (3 images and 1 header) of which the images lack a description in your example. Also with regard to your CSS you might run into undesired behavior for the end/user, since you apply a link to different elements. By that I mean that you MAY have to style differently for the example above. If you try your code you will see it does what is expected in basically all browsers, but why make it difficult for yourself.

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