Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

public class Test2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Test2 obj=new Test2();
        String a=obj.go();

        System.out.print(a);
    }


    public String go() {
        String q="hii";
        try {
            return q;
        }
        finally {
            q="hello";
            System.out.println("finally value of q is "+q);
        }
    }

Why is this printing hii after returning from the function go(), the value has changed to "hello" in the finally block?

the output of the program is

finally value of q is hello
hii
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Alex K, Raedwald, Vladimir, Jeremiah Willcock, gustavohenke Jul 10 '13 at 23:04

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
You might like to read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/65035/… –  Harry Joy Jun 25 '12 at 10:05
2  
The value of local variable q has been changed to "hello", yes. But what you returned was "hii". –  maksimov Jun 25 '12 at 10:13
    
Please look at my new answer...let's try to refine this concept more .. –  Ahmad Jun 26 '12 at 6:50

7 Answers 7

up vote 26 down vote accepted

That's because you returned a value that was evaluated from q before you changed the value of q in the finally block. You returned q, which evaluated its value; then you changed q in the finally block, which didn't affect the loaded value; then the return completed, using the evaluated value.

Don't write tricky code like this. If it confuses the guy who wrote it, imagine the problems it will cause the next guy, a few years down the track when you are somewhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
but the value gets returned after the finally block is executed.. so –  Dennis Jun 25 '12 at 10:09
1  
@Dennis The value to return was loaded before the finally block was executed. I already said that. –  EJP Jun 25 '12 at 10:14
1  
@Dennis yes, but in finally you are already past the return instruction, not immediately before it. –  maksimov Jun 25 '12 at 10:15
1  
thanks a lot, just posted this question for a knowledge update, and no i wont be writing such code.. –  Dennis Jun 25 '12 at 10:17
    
Just to add: When returning an object, the reference to the object is returned. So assigning variable to a different String in finally block doesn't affect the return value. –  nhahtdh Jun 25 '12 at 10:18

return returns value from reference, not exact reference. So return first reads then stores value from reference q. In finally you update q, but that change wont affect value already stored for return. If you want to update that value you will have to use another return in your finally section like

} finally {
    q = "hello";
    System.out.println("finally value of q is " + q);
    return q;//here you set other value in return
}

Without redeclaring return value with return newValue all you can do (in case if non immutable objects, like beans, containers, ...) is change state of stored object

} finally {
    //if q is for example List
    q.add(new Element); //this will place new element (update) in List 
    //object stored by return because it is same object from q reference
    System.out.println("finally value of q is " + q);
}
share|improve this answer
    
'Value (object) +from+ reference, not exact reference', 'read/store object from reference', and 'object stored in return' are meaningless. Not an answer. There's probably an answer in here struggling to get out, but the terminology is so confused that no meaning is conveyed. –  EJP Aug 1 '12 at 21:52

Finally executes after return but before the method actually returns to the caller. This is analogous to throw. It happens after throw and before exiting the block. The return value is already set in some register by reading the variable q. If q was mutable, you could mutate it in finally and you would see that change in the caller. Why does it work this way? For one, it probably is the least complicated to implement. Two, it gives you maximal flexibility. You can override the return value in finally with an explicit return. Preserving it by default lets you choose either behavior.

share|improve this answer

[Edited after comment from EJP, my first response did not answer question and was also wrong.]
Now my answer should be correct explaining that as the try block and the finally block completes normally q is returned. And the reason why the value "hii" is returned is explained in EJPs answer. I'm still looking for an explanation in the JLS.

Have a look at JLS 14.20.2 Execution of try-catch-finally

A try statement with a finally block is executed by first executing the try block. Then there is a choice:

If execution of the try block completes normally, then the finally block is executed, and then there is a choice:
If the finally block completes normally, then the try statement completes normally.
[...]

and JLS 14.17 The return Statement

A return statement with an Expression attempts to transfer control to the invoker of the method that contains it; the value of the Expression becomes the value of the method invocation. More precisely, execution of such a return statement first evaluates the Expression. If the evaluation of the Expression completes abruptly for some reason, then the return statement completes abruptly for that reason. If evaluation of the Expression completes normally, producing a value V, then the return statement completes abruptly, the reason being a return with value V

And:

The preceding descriptions say "attempts to transfer control" rather than just "transfers control" because if there are any try statements (§14.20) within the method or constructor whose try blocks contain the return statement, then any finally clauses of those try statements will be executed, in order, innermost to outermost, before control is transferred to the invoker of the method or constructor. Abrupt completion of a finally clause can disrupt the transfer of control initiated by a return statement.

share|improve this answer
1  
How exactly does this answer the question? –  EJP Jun 25 '12 at 10:20
    
Still doesn't answer the question. 'q' is not returned. The value of q when the return statement was executed is returned. –  EJP Jun 25 '12 at 19:25

Try using StringBuffer instead of String and you will see the change .... it seems the return statement blocks the object which is to be returned and not the reference. You could also try to verify this by printing the hashcode of :

  • object being returned from go()
  • object in finally
  • object being printed from main()

    public static void main(String[] args){

        Test obj=new Test();
            StringBuffer a=obj.go();
            System.out.print(a);
        }
      public StringBuffer go() {
            StringBuffer q=new StringBuffer("hii");
            try {
                return q;
            }
            finally {
                q=q.append("hello");
                System.out.println("finally value of q is "+q);
            }
        }
    
share|improve this answer
    
'Blocks the object which is to be returned' is meaningless. Not an answer. –  EJP Aug 1 '12 at 21:47

What is finally block?

-By definition from Java "The finally block always executes when the try block exits. This ensures that the finally block is executed even if an unexpected exception occurs."

So, it prints "finally value of q is hello" as soon as it exists the try block and goes to line System.out.print(a); and prints the value returned by method go().

If you have a debuggers like netbeans or eclipse, it can be analyzed by keeping the break point and waking through the code.

share|improve this answer

Well, what I found is as follows,

Return actually returns a value and its gets copied to String a=obj.go();, before execution goes to Finally.

Lets verify it by following experiments.

public class Test2 {

   public static void main(String[] args) {
     Test2 obj=new Test2();
     String a=obj.go();

     System.out.print(a);
   } 


   public String go() {
     String q="hii";
     try {
        return q;
     }
     finally {
        q="hello";
        System.out.println("finally value of q is "+q);
     }
}

the output of the program is

finally value of q is hello

hii

and if we take StringBuffer instead of String as follows,

public class Test2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        Test2 obj=new Test2();
        StringBuffer a=obj.go();

        System.out.print(a);
    }


    public  StringBuffer go(){
        StringBuffer q=new StringBuffer("hii");
        try{

            return q;
        }
        finally{

            q.replace(0, q.length(), "hello");
            System.out.println("finally value of q is "+q);
            /*return q1;*/

        }

    }
}

The output comesout to be,

finally value of q is hello

hello

and finally if we take int instead of String as follows,

public class Test2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub

        Test2 obj=new Test2();
        int a=obj.go();

        System.out.print(a);
    }


    public  int go(){
        int q=1;
        try{

            return q;
        }
        finally{

            q=2;
            System.out.println("finally value of q is "+q);
            /*return q1;*/

        }

    }
}

the output is

finally value of q is 2

1

                              **Ananlysis**

1.In first case, return copied adress of String in variable a, then excecution goes to Finally where String is changed. But since in case of Strings, we can't manipulate any String a new String is constructed. So in variable a address of original string is saved, which gets printed.

2.In second case, return copied address of StringBuffer in variable a, and in finally this StringBuffer object is manipulated, rather creating new one. so the value which was stored in variable a also gets manipulated, that's seen in print statement.

3.In third case, value of int is copied in variable a, before execution goes to finally. and thus a gets value of 1. and then in finally we changed value of q which doesn't anyway change value of a.

share|improve this answer
    
quite right..didn't read your answer... –  Ahmad Jun 26 '12 at 10:53
    
Your first two examples are both irrelevant. The first one is just plain wrong code, as String.repace() doesn't mutate the value, it returns a new one which you are throwing away. The second one does mutate the value, but as that's not what the OP is doing I fail to see the point. The third one just reiterates what the OP is asking about, and repeats the answer that had already been given. –  EJP Jun 26 '12 at 12:59

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.