Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
template <class T>
class A {

    struct B {
         T a,b;
    }

    B& operator+ (B & x, B & y) {
        return B(x.a + y.a, x.b + y.b);
    }    

    int funcA (B & x, B & y){
        return (x + y).a;
    }
};

As you might guess, during compilation I get "operator+ must take either zero or one argument". Right. Because in the operator+ the "this" is passed as first argument. So, the a solution is to locate the operator outside of the class A definition. However A's function funcA uses operator+. So it has to be defined before A. But operator+ itself uses class B defined in the A which is a template itself and B is dependent class.

What's the solution?

share|improve this question
    
Forward declaration. –  jxh Jun 25 '12 at 10:04
    
@user315052: While *forward declaration*s are the general answer, in this case it is not, rather than moving the declaration of the operator forward (which cannot be done here) the definition of funcA must be moved downwards. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 25 '12 at 12:26
    
Downwards means where? It is necessary by definition to have funcA as member of A. –  OlegG Jun 25 '12 at 12:32
    
+1 on question, because I liked Steve Jessop's answer so much. –  jxh Jun 25 '12 at 16:21
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: My intention was to achieve the effect of Steve Jessop's answer, but have operator+ forward declared above of A, and implemented below A. I don't understand why an inlined friend can let funcA use (x + y), but an "outlined" friend has to be called explicitly. –  jxh Jun 25 '12 at 16:47

4 Answers 4

There is a way to define a free function inside a class's body:

struct B {
    T a,b;
    // the change from B& to B is nothing to do with defining
    // the function here, it's to avoid returning a dangling reference.
    friend B operator+ (B & x, B & y) {
        return B(x.a + y.a, x.b + y.b);
    }
};

Seems to me that this is the simplest way to deal with this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Why frined if function is inside of class and moreover class is stgruct and all memebers are public accessible? And second thing does it prevent us from passing "this" to the operator+ as first argument? –  OlegG Jun 25 '12 at 11:54
    
However, it works. Why???? –  OlegG Jun 25 '12 at 12:27
    
It's a free function, not a member function. So no, you can't use this. The reason I have made it a struct with all members public, is that you did the same for the class B in your code. –  Steve Jessop Jun 25 '12 at 12:58
    
It needs to return a value, not a reference to a temporary; and it would be more polite to take the arguments by value or const reference. –  Mike Seymour Jun 25 '12 at 13:31
    
@Mike: true, I just copied the questioner's definition of the function in order to demonstrate the technique. –  Steve Jessop Jun 25 '12 at 13:45

I think that B& operator+ (B & x, B & y) should be defined static....

share|improve this answer
1  
Good idea. But. It claims "opeator+ must be either a non-static member function or a non-member function" –  OlegG Jun 25 '12 at 12:04

In addition to @SteveJessop's answer - which is the best answer - if the operator is to be a member, it has to be a member of B, not of A:

template <typename T>
class A {
public:
    struct B {
       T a,b;
       B(const T& x, const T& y) : a(x), b(y) {}
       B operator+(const B& rhs) const { return B(a + rhs.a, b + rhs.b); }
    };

    T funcA (B & x, B & y){
        return (x + y).a;
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
As for me, it is much more elegant solution than with friend one. And much more natural. But is it possible in case, say, operator* (int a, B & x) and operator* (B & x, int a) ? Seems, we have to use friend here. –  OlegG Jun 26 '12 at 6:44
    
@Oleg: Yes, you have to do that. The most popular way to implement operators is to do the "assignment-like" operators (+=, *=, etc.) as members, then do the corresponding binary operators (+, *,...) as free functions in terms of the assignment operators. –  molbdnilo Jun 26 '12 at 13:37

You can forward declare operator+ to be outside A, but funcA has to call it explicitly. For this case, you probably do not want to define operator+ outside of A, but since you had asked

So, the a solution is to locate the operator outside of the class A definition. ... How to be?

this answer illustrates how it could be.

Like molbdnilo, I also agree that Steve Jessop's answer is the best, and is the answer you should adopt for this problem.

template <class T> class A;
template <class T>
typename A<T>::B operator + (typename A<T>::B &x, typename A<T>::B &y);

template <class T>
class A {
    template <class U>
    friend typename A<U>::B operator + (typename A<U>::B &x,
                                        typename A<U>::B &y);
    struct B {
         T a,b;
         B(T x, T y) : a(x), b(y) {}
    };
    static T funcA (B & x, B & y) {
        return ::operator+<T>(x, y).a;    
    }
public:
    A () {
        B a(0, 1);
        B b(1, 0);
        funcA(a, b);
    }
};

template <class T>
typename A<T>::B operator + (typename A<T>::B &x,
                             typename A<T>::B &y) {
    return typename A<T>::B(x.a + y.a, x.b + y.b);
}
share|improve this answer
    
There are a few things in this design that are wrong. The first one is that you are opening the A type to that operator+ which needs not have access to A at all. The second issue is that you are opening access to all specializations of operator+ --which is wrong and prone to abuse see this. That and the fact that it is more complicated than better solutions makes this a no-go. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 25 '12 at 17:17
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: I don't disagree, but I disagree with the sentiment "you can't forward declare". The correct sentiment is "you may not want to". But the answer is illustrative for the cases when someone does want to. I'll clarify the post. Thanks and regards –  jxh Jun 25 '12 at 17:30
    
Note that you can still not forward declare the operator+ as a free function, only as a template free function. There are differences that most people don't quite grasp, but those are different concepts. One of the most important differences in this case is that with Steve's answer the template is providing the only implementation available for addition, while in your proposed solution, users can change the semantics of operator+ by providing specializations. There are other differences, but that is the most visible one. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jun 25 '12 at 18:34
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Yes, they can specialize operator+, just as they could have specialized A itself in all the solutions. You can't stop programmers from circumventing an API when they are provided the full source in a header file except by enforcing programmer discipline. –  jxh Jun 25 '12 at 19:50
    
@user315052: Sorry for santiments, but you're able to force me to respect C++. I thought I've found a dead lock of C++. But now I see I've found a dead lock of my skill :) Thanks! –  OlegG Jun 26 '12 at 6:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.