Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to break some of my old habits of writing bad code. One of them is where to put validation code. I don't think validation should be in the presentation layer. Or there could be some validation there?

Here is an example of what I used to do

protected void SaveBtn_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{

  Item itm = new Item();
  itm.Name = txtName.Text;

  if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(itm.Name))
  {
     //reject
  }
  else
  {
     ItemBLL.Save(itm); //no more validation here
  }
}

OR

public class ItemBLL
{

   public static int Save(Item itm)
   {
      //no more validation in .aspx.vb
      if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(itm.Name))
      {
        //reject
      }
      else
      {
       //Save item
      }
   }
}

I have been using the first approach and I am thinking of switching to the second but I can't anticipate what the problem would be or the advantage of one over the other. Please advice is appreciated even for better approach

UPDATE: I agree that for the sake of the users simple validation (e.g. common mistakes) should be done in presentation (.aspx) (using javascript, jQuery).

Some business logic validation should also reside in the BLL for portability and reusability.

Does this mean we can skip validation in codebehind (.aspx.vb or .aspx.cs)?

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Both is best, but the BLL is a must. Today your business class is only used by the one interface - the browser, but tomorrow maybe you may want a web service to also use that class. Then you will need all of the business rules to be in the class, not the web page. But a lot of rules you will want to test client-side in Javascript to provide a responsive interface. The example you give where the Name cannot be empty is a classic for testing in Javascript and not allowing the "Save" button to be enabled until the Name has a value. However, lets say the Name field has to be unique - this may not be something you want to validate client-side, and are willing to wait until it gets to the server.

share|improve this answer
    
the reason why I wanted the BLL is portability which you mentioned. With the mention of checking empty name with Javascript, if a different person implemented the presentation layer and he didn't validate the field, this will allow NULL to be passed to my database if I did not check it in the BLL – codingbiz Jun 25 '12 at 11:10

Depends on what you mean by 'validation' - it's perfectly legitimate (and preferable, IMO) to do simple data validation in the presentation layer, especially if it saves the wait time of a round-trip postback to the server. That's kind of the whole point of the Unobtrusive Validation library in jQuery, for instance - prevent the user from submitting data we know is not valid (empty required fields, letters where only numbers are valid, etc.).

I would also say that it isn't such a bad idea to have a sort-of "checkpoint" mentality to validation: once you cross a boundary between layers (especially if you're mapping to different data classes at any point), make sure the data is kosher for what that layer intends to do with it.

One advantage to having each layer validate in some fashion is that if you reuse that layer again somewhere, the validation logic comes along with it, rather than needing to be reimplemented again in the new project.

Of course, this is just my opinion (from my experience). I'd like to hear what more experienced developers have to say...

share|improve this answer
    
can we now say that: put javascript validation in the markup page (.aspx), skip the .aspx.cs page and do more validation in BLL? – codingbiz Jun 27 '12 at 15:01
    
I would say that depends on how much effort is required to transition to your business layer. If your application is tiered (physical separation amongst components), the expense (computational or otherwise) of spinning up or connecting to that layer may outweigh the benefit of simplifying the upper layers. Otherwise, I would say, unfortunately, that "it depends." There really is no "always true" answer. Context is king... – Tieson T. Jun 28 '12 at 3:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.