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  1. User inputs positive int value (number);
  2. User prints number int values;
  3. Need to find max value and print it.

My code is

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int number;
    int max;
    int temp;

    scanf("%d", &number);
    scanf("%d", &max);

    for ( int i = 1; i < number; i++ ) {
        scanf("%d", &temp);
        if ( temp > max ) {
            max = temp;
        }
    }

    printf("%d\n", max);
    return 0;
}

This works but online test tool says i need to optimize code, because it uses too many operations. Arrays are forbidden. Can only use stdio.

share|improve this question
3  
What is the point of scanf("%d", &max);? –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 10:23
2  
What test tool? –  Mark Jun 25 '12 at 10:23
2  
Set max to INT_MIN (from <limits.h>) initially, don't input it. If you're going to ask the user for the max, there's no point in writing a program to find it, is ther? –  unwind Jun 25 '12 at 10:24
4  
@unwind - Actually, OP uses max to input the first number, then inputs the next number - 1 numbers in a loop. i.e. its just a weird way to write this program, but it is functionally correct. –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 10:26
2  
I don't think that that problem could be solved with less operations ...? –  Kay Jun 25 '12 at 10:30

6 Answers 6

By using Duff's device you could save some comparisons in the for-loop. It'd be a bad practice, but maybe that's what you are expected to do.

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {
    unsigned max = 0;
    unsigned length;
    scanf("%u", &length);

    unsigned temp = 0;
    unsigned iterations = (length+8-1) / 8;
    switch (length % 8) {
        case 0: do { scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 7:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 6:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 5:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 4:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 3:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 2:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        case 1:      scanf("%u", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
                } while (--iterations > 0);
    }

    printf("%u\n", max);
    return 0;
}

I used unsigned ints, because you said you only have positive numbers. The code assumes that the sequence has at least one element.

Update 1:

Example using manual loop unrolling. That's an even worse practice than Duff's device. Maybe the testing tool you got will like it, but you should never use this code to impress a potential employer!

#include <stdio.h>

int main (void) {
    signed max = -0x80000000;
    unsigned length;
    scanf("%u", &length);

    signed temp;
    for (; length >= 8; length -= 8) {
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
    }
    if (length > 4) {
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
        length -= 4;
    }
    for (; length > 0; --length) {
        scanf("%d", &temp); if (temp > max) max = temp;
    }

    printf("%d\n", max);
    return 0;
}

Update 2:

You stated that your evaluation tool likes it if scanf is less often called, so:

#include <stdio.h>
int main (void) {
    signed max = -0x80000000;
    unsigned length;
    scanf("%u", &length);

    signed t1, t2, t3, t4, t5, t6, t7, t8;
    for (; length >= 8; length -= 8) {
        scanf("%d%d%d%d%d%d%d%d", &t1, &t2, &t3, &t4, &t5, &t6, &t7, &t8);
        if (t1 > max) max = t1;
        if (t2 > max) max = t2;
        if (t3 > max) max = t3;
        if (t4 > max) max = t4;
        if (t5 > max) max = t5;
        if (t6 > max) max = t6;
        if (t7 > max) max = t7;
        if (t8 > max) max = t8;
    }
    if (length > 4) {
        scanf("%d%d%d%d", &t1, &t2, &t3, &t4);
        if (t1 > max) max = t1;
        if (t2 > max) max = t2;
        if (t3 > max) max = t3;
        if (t4 > max) max = t4;
        length -= 4;
    }
    for (; length > 0; --length) {
        scanf("%d", &t1); if (t1 > max) max = t1;
    }

    printf("%d\n", max);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
positive was about the number of elements only –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 11:07
2  
+1 for Duff's Device –  SpacedMonkey Jun 25 '12 at 11:07
    
@unkulunkulu, I read it wrong, sorry. I leave the task for OP to change it back to signed. ;-) –  Kay Jun 25 '12 at 11:08
    
@kay, right, this is not a vital point, sure :) –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 11:22
    
thanks for response. tool doesn't work with case-switch and do-while. Is its possible to remake this with if-else and for or i should just commit suicide? –  user1479645 Jun 25 '12 at 11:55

I'd like to know what test tool says you have too many operations that isn't some code golf competition. Also, what the number of acceptable operations is and how they define 'operation'.

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int numbersLeft,
        number,
        max = 0;

    scanf("%d", &numbersLeft);

    while ( numbersLeft-- ) {
        scanf("%d", &number);
        max = number > max? number: max;
    }

    printf("%d\n", max);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Sure, use INT_MIN instead of 0 –  SpacedMonkey Jun 25 '12 at 10:57
    
That's why I asked how they define operation. Is it the number of operands the code compiles to or is it the number of instructions used to run through a list. –  SpacedMonkey Jun 25 '12 at 10:58
    
With code i posted. Test tool says "161 operations". If set max to "-2147483647 - 1" then its "174 operations". i can't use limits.h –  user1479645 Jun 25 '12 at 11:00
    
Right. We don't know what an 'operation' is here. But if anything, inputting the first number into max will reduce the number of 'operations', or keep it the same (as per any definition of operation). I like your answer, but I really would like it if you do this too. –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 11:01
1  
@SpacedMonkey - It is unfortunate that students are being judged on meaningless, unexplained criterion, with meaningless restrictions. Anyway, you reduced an 'operation' (IMO), by getting rid of a loop initializer. For this, +1. –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 11:18

Your 'test tool' is probably broken, or expects you to do meaningless micro-optimizations while making code hard to read, which the compiler will do anyway.

  1. You need to ask the user for the number of numbers => 1 scanf. You did this.
  2. Next you need to ask the user for number numbers => scanf, number times. You did this.
  3. Next you need to find the largest => loop number times, and compare. You already achieved this in the same loop as the previous one. And you did it well because you did the minimum possible number - 1 comparisons.
  4. Next you need to print the result => 1 printf. You did this too.

This is the fastest you can possibly get[1]. There is no scope for 'optimization'.

[1] If you had 2 cores, and were writing a multi-threaded program, you could do step 2 and 3 faster by pipelining them (see unkulunkulu's comments for why this is the fastest you can get).

share|improve this answer
    
parallelizing couldn't help here, this comparison will be pipelined easily. Computing maximum while reading from file has zero overhead. –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 10:55
    
Thanks for response. With code i posted. Test tool says "161 operations". If set max to "-2147483647 - 1" then its "174 operations". I don't know if its broken. I REALLY need to pass this task, my life depends on it. –  user1479645 Jun 25 '12 at 10:56
    
@unkulunkulu - Depends. I could split the loop into 2, input in the first, and then compare parallely in the second. With more than 2 CPUs, and enough input, this could be much faster than a pipeline. –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 10:57
    
How does the tool work? You upload the .c file, or you upload a binary? –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 10:59
    
@ArjunShankar, once again, reading while comparing is not slower than just reading. Not even a microsecond slower, that comparison doesn't add anything, and I bet you cannot scan all the numbers faster. Even 1-core processor is a parallel thing, it makes these comparisons in parallel. –  unkulunkulu Jun 25 '12 at 11:02

Should have used 1 scanf() instead of two:

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int number;
    int max;
    int temp;

    scanf("%d %d", &number, &max);
    for ( int i = 1; i < number; i++ ) {
        scanf("%d", &temp);
        if ( temp > max ) {
            max = temp;
        }
    }
    printf("%d\n", max);
    return 0;
}

Sorry, and thanks to everyone! Hugs and kisses!

share|improve this answer
1  
Good! Mark this answer 'correct' when you eventually can. –  ArjunShankar Jun 25 '12 at 12:49

You don't really need the i variable: you can use number itself.

Also you may want to abuse the for statement :)

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    int number;
    int max;
    int temp;

    for (scanf("%d", &number), scanf("%d", &max)
       ; --number && scanf("%d", &temp)
       ; )
    {
        if (temp > max) max = temp;
    }

    printf("%d\n", max);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
can't use operators in for statement only i++ stuff works. –  user1479645 Jun 25 '12 at 11:27
    
So we know you need to scanf("%d", &max); before the for() but @pmg still has a point. Get rid of i by using for ( ; --number; ) –  SpacedMonkey Jun 25 '12 at 11:39
#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int number;
    int max;
    int temp,i;

    scanf("%d", &number);

    for ( i = 0; i < number; i++ ) {
        scanf("%d", &temp);
        if(i==0)
            max=temp;
        if ( temp > max ) {
            max = temp;
        }
    }

printf("max=%d\n", max);
return 0;

}

share|improve this answer
    
Compliance with the conditions? –  Ling Tze Hock Jun 25 '12 at 14:14
    
-1 You even added further comparisons. –  Kay Jun 25 '12 at 14:33
    
Does not meet the conditions? –  Ling Tze Hock Jun 25 '12 at 15:41

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