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I'm struggling to get my head around how to do the following:

I have several methods that return different strongly-typed IEnumerable objects. These strongly-typed class share a common base class that exposes properties I want to access in a Linq selector.

However I can't seem to get this working. If I just pass the base type in the method then I get errors when binding the IEnumerable because the properties available in the derived class are not available.

If I try to pass the type then because the Linq expression does not know the type I can't access the properties that I need in my Linq expression.

I need to somehow tell the Linq expression that my IEnumerable of type is derived from my base class. Below is an example of what I'm trying to do:

private IEnumerable<MyStronglyTypedResultSet> GetReportDetails()
{
  // this returns the IEnumerable of the derived type
}

public class MyBaseClass
{
    public Guid UserId {get; set;}
    public string OfficeName {get; set;}
}

public class MyStronglyTypedResultSet : MyBaseClass
{
   public string FullName {get; set;}
   public int Age {get; set;}
}

public void MyProblemMethod<T>(IEnumerable<T> allData, string officeToFind)
{
    // How do I tell Linq that my <T> type is derived from 'MyBaseClass' so I can access the 'OfficeName' property?

    IEnumerable<T> myData = allData.Where(c => c.OfficeName .ToLower().Equals(officeToFind.ToLower()));
    MyUsefulObject.DataSource= myData; // This needs to have access to the properties in 'MyStronglyTypedResultSet' 
    MyUsefulObject.DataaBind();
}
share|improve this question
1  
Use string.Equals(x, y, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) for case insensitve comparison. ToLower comparison will eventually fail. – adrianm Jun 25 '12 at 10:56
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Change your method like below

public void MyProblemMethod<T>(IEnumerable<T> allData, string officeToFind) where T : MyBaseClass
{
    // How do I tell Linq that my <T> type is derived from 'MyBaseClass' so I can access the 'OfficeName' property?

    IEnumerable<T> myData = allData.Where(c => c.OfficeName .ToLower().Equals(officeToFind.ToLower()));
    MyUsefulObject.DataSource= myData; // This needs to have access to the properties in 'MyStronglyTypedResultSet' 
    MyUsefulObject.DataaBind();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I knew I was missing something! Thanks – Chris B Jun 26 '12 at 8:45
    
I also was getting a null reference exception when binding the resulting IEnumerable caused by the deferred nature of Linq. This was fixed by putting ToList() at the end of the query. – Chris B Jun 26 '12 at 9:45

You can use the OfType extension method.

public void MyProblemMethod<T>(IEnumerable<T> allData, string officeToFind)
{
    // How do I tell Linq that my <T> type is derived from 'MyBaseClass' so I can access the 'OfficeName' property?

    IEnumerable<T> myData = allData.OfType<MyBaseClass>.Where(c => c.OfficeName .ToLower().Equals(officeToFind.ToLower()));
    MyUsefulObject.DataSource= myData;
    MyUsefulObject.DataaBind();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This also worked thanks – Chris B Jun 26 '12 at 8:46

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