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I have a std::atomic which contains a pointer to a member function. Everything compiles fine in g++ 4.4.5, but I get this error during linking:

./pool.o: In function `pool::worker::worker(pool&, int, int)':
pool.cpp:(.text._ZN4pool6workerC1ERS_ii[pool::worker::worker(pool&, int, int)]+0x95): undefined reference to `std::atomic<void (pool::* const*)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*)>::store(void (pool::* const*)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*), std::memory_order) volatile'
./pool.o: In function `pool::worker::give_job(void (pool::* const&)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*), unsigned int, unsigned int)':
pool.cpp:(.text._ZN4pool6worker8give_jobERKMS_FvjjPS0_Ejj[pool::worker::give_job(void (pool::* const&)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*), unsigned int, unsigned int)]+0x142): undefined reference to `std::atomic<void (pool::* const*)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*)>::store(void (pool::* const*)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*), std::memory_order) volatile'
./pool.o: In function `pool::worker::soul()':
pool.cpp:(.text._ZN4pool6worker4soulEv[pool::worker::soul()]+0xf1): undefined reference to `std::atomic<void (pool::* const*)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*)>::store(void (pool::* const*)(unsigned int, unsigned int, pool::worker*), std::memory_order) volatile'

I don't really undertand why it's trying to link to the volatile overloads of store(), where in the source the pointer to the member function is const, not volatile (and it compiles).

The same code compiles with g++ 4.6.3

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Simple: GCC 4.4 didn't have support for this or it is broken in the way you experienced. Newer GCC has better support and it works like it should.

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sob, I guess there's no workaround –  Lorenzo Pistone Jun 25 '12 at 12:24
    
There is: use a newer GCC. It's not even a workaround, it's common sense ;) –  rubenvb Jun 25 '12 at 12:28
    
I care about backward compatibility. Latest Debian still runs 4.4 (and that's pretty much the reason for which noticed this bug). –  Lorenzo Pistone Jun 25 '12 at 12:36
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@LorenzoPistone then you shouldn't have used C++11 features not fully functional with that GCC. And Debian has testing GCC 4.5-4.7 packages if you need em. –  rubenvb Jun 25 '12 at 12:42
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"I care about backward compatibility" contradicts your use of a feature documented as "Important: GCC's support for C++11 is still experimental. Some features were implemented based on early proposals, and no attempt will be made to maintain backward compatibility when they are updated to match the final C++11 standard." Especially when using a compiler released before the final standard. –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 25 '12 at 12:45
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