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I have a test file:

0000 850 1300    Pump  4112 893 2400    Installing sleeve  5910 890 2202    Installing tool 
Testing crankcase and  Protecting oil seal  Installing crankshaft 
carburetor for leaks  (starter side)  5910 890 2208    Installing tool, 8 
0000 855 8106    Sealing plate  4112 893 2401    Press sleeve  Installing hookless 
Sealing exhaust port  Installing oil seal  snap rings in piston 
0000 855 9200    Nipple  (clutch side)  5910 890 2301    Screwdriver, T20 
Testing carburetor for         4118 890 6400    Setting gauge  Separating handle 
leaks  Setting air gap  moldings 
0000 890 1701    Testing tool kit  between ignition  5910 890 2400    Screwdriver, T27x150 
0000 893 2600    Clamping strap  module and flywheel  For all IS screw

I want to print only:

0000 850 1300
4112 893 2400
5910 890 2202
5910 890 2208
0000 855 8106
.
.
.

Thank you for your help.

EDIT:

The numbers in the file are in different places. The numbers are randomly placed in the input file. Each number is the format:

xxxx xxx xxxx 

EDIT-1:

I tried two ways, but it does not work on mawk:

pic@pic:~/Pulpit$ mawk --traditional -f script.awk infile
mawk: not an option: --traditional
pic@pic:~/Pulpit$ mawk -f script.awk infile
pic@pic:~/Pulpit$ 
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried yourself so far? –  Kenneth Hoste Jun 25 '12 at 12:16
    
I tried this: awk '{gsub(/[A-z\/(),;-.]/, ""); print}' file –  Tedee12345 Jun 25 '12 at 12:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is shorter and looks for the specific pattern:

mawk '
    BEGIN {
        d = "[0-9]"
    }; 
    {
        offset = 1; 
        while (RSTART + RLENGTH < length($0)) {
            if (! match(substr($0, offset), d d d d " " d d d " " d d d d)) {
                next
            }; 
            print substr($0, RSTART+offset - 1, RLENGTH); 
            offset = RSTART + RLENGTH + offset
        }
    }' inputfile
share|improve this answer
    
A very good solution. Thank you. –  Tedee12345 Jun 25 '12 at 19:38

One way with grep (if your version supports the -P flag):

grep -oP "[0-9]{4} [0-9]{3} [0-9]{4}" file.txt

Output:

0000 850 1300
4112 893 2400
5910 890 2202
5910 890 2208
0000 855 8106
4112 893 2401
0000 855 9200
5910 890 2301
4118 890 6400
0000 890 1701
5910 890 2400
0000 893 2600

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for proposals for a solution, but I want to do it in awk. –  Tedee12345 Jun 25 '12 at 13:54

One way using awk:

Assuming infile has the content provided in your question:

Content of script.awk:

{
    ## Traverse all words of the line but last two. I assume to print three 
    ## consecutive number fields.
    i = 1 
    while ( i <= NF - 3 ) { 

        ## Set current word position in line.
        j = i 

        ## Get next word while current one is a digit, and save it to print later.
        while ( $j ~ /^[[:digit:]]+$/ ) { 
            value[j] = $j
            ++j 
        }   

        ## If found three consecutive number fields, print them and update counter of
        ## words in the line.
        if ( i + 3 == j ) { 
            for ( key in value ) { 
                printf "%s ", value[key]
            }   
            printf ORS 
            i += 3
        }   
        else {
            ## Failed the search, go to next field and try again.
            ++i 
        }   

        ## Delete array where I save numbers.
        # delete value           <--- Commented for compatibility with older versions.
        for ( key in value ) { 
            delete value[key]
        }
    }   
}

Run it like:

awk -f script.awk infile

With following output:

0000 850 1300 
4112 893 2400 
5910 890 2202 
5910 890 2208 
0000 855 8106 
4112 893 2401 
0000 855 9200 
5910 890 2301 
4118 890 6400 
0000 890 1701 
5910 890 2400 
0000 893 2600
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for proposals for a solution. Your solution works to gawk, but it does not work on mawk. example: $ mawk -f script.awk infile pic@pic:~/Pulpit$ –  Tedee12345 Jun 25 '12 at 13:52
    
@Tedee12345: I tried to run it again with --traditional switch and gave this error: awk: script.awk:31: error: 'delete array' is a gawk extension, so I've edited the answer. Does it work now? –  Birei Jun 25 '12 at 14:15
    
Birei: See my edit-1. –  Tedee12345 Jun 25 '12 at 14:52
    
@Tedee12345: --traditional is an option of gawk to work as the old awk, not an option for mawk. I can't access to mawk to test this script so can't help with it. Perhaps [[:digit::]] is not valid and [0-9] is needed instead but it's a shot in the dark. You can also try to debug it adding print commands to see where it fails. –  Birei Jun 25 '12 at 15:06
    
There is no problem. Well, it works with gawk. Thank you for your help. –  Tedee12345 Jun 25 '12 at 16:14

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