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I've recently been reading about IObservable. So far, i've looked at various SO questions, and watched a video on what they can do. The whole "push" mechanism I'm thinking is brilliant, but I'm still trying to figure out what exactly everything does. From my readings, I guess in a way an IObservable is something that can be 'watched', and IObservers are the 'watchers'.

So now I'm off to try and implement this in my application. There are a few things I would like to nut out before I get started. I've seen that IObservable is the opposite of IEnumerable, however, I can't really see any places in my particular instance that I can incorporate into my app.

Currently, I make heavy use of events, so much that I can see the 'plumbing' is starting to get unmanageable. I would think, that IObservable can help me out here.

Consider the following design, which is my wrapper around my I/O within my application (FYI, I typically have to deal with strings):

I have a base interface called IDataIO:

public interface IDataIO
{
  event OnDataReceived;
  event OnTimeout:
  event OnTransmit;
}

Now, I currently have three classes that implement this interface, each of these classes in some way utilize Async method calls, introducing some type of multithreaded processing:

public class SerialIO : IDataIO;
public class UdpIO : IDataIO;
public class TcpIO : IDataIO;

There is a single instance of each of these classes wrapped up into my final class, called IO (which also implements IDataIO - adhering to my strategy pattern):

public class IO : IDataIO
{
  public SerialIO Serial;
  public UdpIO Udp;
  public TcpIO Tcp;
}

I have utilized the strategy pattern to encapsulate these three classes, so that when changing between the different IDataIO instances at runtime makes it 'invisible' to the end user. As you could imagine, this has led to quite a bit of 'event plumbing' in the background.

So, how can I utilize 'push' notification here in my case? Instead of subscribing to events (DataReceived etc) I would like to simply push the data to anyone that's interested. I'm a bit unsure of where to get started. I'm still trying to toy with the ideas/generic classes of Subject, and the various incarnations of this (ReplaySubject/AsynSubject/BehaviourSubject). Could someone please enlighten me on this one (maybe with reference to my design)? Or is this simply not an ideal fit for IObservable?

PS. Feel free to correct any of my 'misunderstandings' :)

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2 Answers 2

This is definitely an ideal case for observables. The IO class will probably see the most improvement. To start with, lets change the interface to use observables and see how simple the combining class becomes.

public interface IDataIO
{
    //you will have to fill in the types here.  Either the event args
    //the events provide now or byte[] or something relevant would be good.
    IObservable<???> DataReceived;
    IObservable<???> Timeout;
    IObservable<???> Transmit;
}

public class IO : IDataIO
{
    public SerialIO Serial;
    public UdpIO Udp;
    public TcpIO Tcp;

    public IObservable<???> DataReceived
    {
        get 
        {
            return Observable.Merge(Serial.DataReceived,
                                    Udp.DataReceived,
                                    Tcp.DataReceived);
        }
    }

    //similarly for other two observables
}

SIDE NOTE: You may notice that I changed the interface member names. In .NET events are typically named <event name> and the functions that raise them are called On<event name>.

For the producing classes, you have a few options that depend on the actual sources. Suppose you are using the .NET SerialPort class in the SerialIO and that DataReceived returns an IObservable<byte[]>. Since the SerialPort already has an event for data received, you can use that directly to make the observable you need.

public class SerialIO : IDataIO
{
    private SerialPort _port;

    public IObservable<byte[]> DataRecived
    {
        get
        {
            return Observable.FromEventPattern<SerialDataReceivedEventHandler,
                                               SerialDataReceivedEventArgs>(
                        h => _port.DataReceived += h,
                        h => _port.DataReceived -= h)
                   .Where(ep => ep.EventArgs.EventType == SerialData.Chars)
                   .Select(ep =>
                           {
                              byte[] buffer = new byte[_port.BytesToRead];
                              _port.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
                              return buffer;
                           });
        }
    }
}

For cases where you don't have an existing event source, you may need to use a subject as RichK suggested. His answer covers that usage pattern quite well, so I won't duplicate that here.

You did not show how you use this interface, but depending on the use case, it may make more sense to have other functions on these classes return IObservables themselves and do away with these "events" entirely. With an event-based async pattern, you have to have events separate from the function you call to trigger the work, but with observables, you can return them from the function instead to make it more obvious what you are subscribing for. That approach also allows the observables returned from each call to send OnError and OnCompleted messages to signal the end of an operation. Based on your use of a combining class, I don't expect this to be useful in this particular case, but it is something to keep in mind.

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+1 Thanks, there is some good information here. Just on the Merge() statement - this merges a sequence of observables into 1 - In my app, i will only ever be using one of the (serial/udp/tcp) at once and allowing the user to switch between the different interfaces (hence my dilemma with event plumbing). Is this recommended here to merge the observables? Appreciate the link to the Async Serial events :) –  Simon Jun 26 '12 at 4:32
    
@Simon You could apply a Where to the observables from the wrapped classes when merging them that checks a "CurrentSource" or similar property to filter out unwanted messages. –  Gideon Engelberth Jun 26 '12 at 18:25
    
@Simon or you could (preferably) stop the production of messages on the other observables so that Merge is receiving only one at a time. If that is the case, it's probably better to use Switch rather than Merge. –  yamen Jun 26 '12 at 20:51

Observables are great for representing streams of data, so your DataReceived event would model nicely to the observable pattern, something like IObservable<byte> or IObservable<byte[]>. You also get the added benefit of OnError and OnComplete which are handy.

In terms of implementing it, it's hard to say for your exact scenario but we often use Subject as the underlying source and call OnNext to push data. Maybe something like

// Using a subject is probably the easiest way to push data to an Observable
// It wraps up both IObservable and IObserver so you almost never use IObserver directly
private readonly Subject<byte> subject = new Subject<byte>();

private void OnPort_DataReceived(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // This pushes the data to the IObserver, which is probably just a wrapper
    // around your subscribe delegate is you're using the Rx extensions
    this.subject.OnNext(port.Data); // pseudo code 
}

You can then expose the subject through a property:

public IObservable<byte> DataObservable
{
    { get { return this.subject; } } // Or this.subject.AsObservable();
}

You can replace your DataReceived event on IDataIO with an IObservable and have each strategy class handle their data in whichever manner they need and push off to the Subject.

On the other side, whoever subscribes to the Observable is then able to either handle it like an event (just by using an Action) or you can perform some really useful work on the stream with Select, Where, Buffer etc...

private IDataIO dataIo = new ...

private void SubscribeToData()
{ 
    dataIo.DataObservable.Buffer(16).Subscribe(On16Bytes);
}

private void On16Bytes(IList<byte> bytes)
{
    // do stuff
}

ReplaySubject/ConnectableObservables are great when you know your subscriber is going to be arriving late to the party but still needs to catch up on all of the events. The source caches everything it's pushed and replays everything for each subscriber. Only you can say whether that's the behaviour you actually need (but be careful because it will cache everything which is going increase your memory usage obviously).

When I was learning about Rx I found http://leecampbell.blogspot.co.uk/ blog series on Rx to be very informative to understand the theory (the posts are a little dated now and the APIs have changed so watch out for that)

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Hi RichK, could you please elaborate on the Subject property? How is this declared? And the user of this class, how exactly would they 'subscribe' to the IObservable DataReceived. –  Simon Jun 25 '12 at 13:53
    
@Simon I've made a few edits, let me know if you're still unsure :) –  RichK Jun 25 '12 at 14:24
    
Thanks, that clears a few things up. Just 1 thing, I'm assuming the dataIo.DataObservable is the public IObservable<byte> DataObservable ? –  Simon Jun 25 '12 at 14:38
    
yup, sorry, the code isn't quite right - I forgot to name that property! [fixed] –  RichK Jun 25 '12 at 14:48
    
1 final thing before i get stuck into coding, I predominantly work with string messages that, well, don't really require me to buffer byte 'streams'. They come in complete and I process them. Is the observable model still a good fit here? –  Simon Jun 26 '12 at 0:46

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