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I need a little help getting this script doing what I want it to.

SELECT KM.initials, 
       TPL.debprice, 
       TMP.pricegroup, 
       TMP.date 
FROM   klientmedarbejder KM 
       INNER JOIN timeprismedarbejderprisgruppe TMP 
               ON KM.employeeno = TMP.employeeno 
       INNER JOIN timeprisprisgruppelinie TPL 
               ON TMP.pricegroup = TPL.pricegroup 
GROUP  BY KM.initials, 
          TMP.date, 
          TPL.debprice, 
          TMP.pricegroup, 
          TPL.date 
HAVING ( Max(TMP.dato) = TPL.date ) 

What I need is the debPrice with the latest (max) date. An employee goes through his career, once in a while his price gets upgraded. Price gets selected from a set list of prices.

  1. KlientMedarbejder is the employee table.
  2. TimeprisMedarbejderPrisgruppe is the list of date his record get upgrade to the new price.
  3. TimeprisPrisgruppeLinie is the list of prices you can have.

I have the solution down to 2 options per employee. Hence:

emp A - 300 - 9 - 1900-01-01  
emp A - 500 - 4 - 2012-01-01  
emp B - 400 - 6 - 1900-01-01  
emp B - 800 - 8 - 2012-04-01  

Hence, first record is the default from whenever he joined the company. In 2012 he was finally good enough for a better price tag. Now I need the answer with the latest date on the upgrade list for each employee. Hence emp A should give me 500 and emp B should give me 800. Now not all employees may have had the 01-01 or 04-01 price update. Some employees have had up to 8 upgrades over time, I only care for the latest.

Client I'm pulling this data from is running an SQL Server 2000.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The typical solution for SQL Server 2000 is to isolate the employeeno and their max date (this is much easier in 2005+). Pseudo-code:

SELECT d.columns, etc. FROM
(
  SELECT employeeno, [date] = MAX([date])
  FROM dbo.tablewithdates
  GROUP BY employeeno
) AS grouped_emp
INNER JOIN dbo.tablewithdates AS d
ON d.employeeno = grouped_emp.employeeno
AND d.[date] = grouped_emp.[date]
INNER JOIN ...

The danger is if employeeno + date is not unique, you could get multiple rows, so you need to determine how to deal with ties.

I would write it for your schema but I can't reverse engineer your query to figure out which table is which. Start simple and work up.

share|improve this answer
    
You forgot the group by clause on the inline view. –  Conrad Frix Jun 25 '12 at 14:29
    
Thanks @ConradFrix. Like I said, pseudo-code. :-) –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 25 '12 at 14:36
    
Thanx, gave me that last push I needed. Much appreciated. –  DoStuffZ Jun 25 '12 at 15:32

The HAVING clause takes place after the group by, so it can only use aggregated columns.

You need to calcualte the max date before the group by. This requires adding in a subquery for the calculation and then a WHERE clause to do the right filtering:

SELECT KM.initials, TPL.debprice, TMP.pricegroup, TMP.date
FROM klientmedarbejder KM INNER JOIN
     timeprismedarbejderprisgruppe TMP
     ON KM.employeeno = TMP.employeeno INNER JOIN
     timeprisprisgruppelinie TPL
     ON TMP.pricegroup = TPL.pricegroup join
     (select employeeno, MAX(dato) as maxdato
      from timeprismedarbejderprisgruppe t
      group by employeeno
     ) tmax
     on tmax.employeeno = tmp.employeeno
 where tmp.dato = tmax.maxdato   
 GROUP  BY KM.initials, TMP.date, TPL.debprice, TMP.pricegroup, TPL.date
share|improve this answer
    
Why a where clause? Isn't that part of the join criteria? –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 25 '12 at 14:37
    
You can do it either way. If you are really asking, it is because when I looked at the original query, I thought "oh, that HAVING clause really should be a WHERE clause to do what he wants to do." –  Gordon Linoff Jun 25 '12 at 15:32
    
Ok, one of the benefits of INNER JOIN syntax vs. simple FROM x,y,z syntax is that you can logically separate the join criteria from the filter criteria. So I would find this form slightly less readable if actual filter criteria were to be added. YMMV. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 25 '12 at 15:46
    
We can agree to disagree. The query is doing an inner join on what looks to me like the natural key between the two tables. In fact, I'd be inclined to do a natural join here. The WHERE clause is an additional condition. Do realize that I also abhor the FROM x,y,z syntax. I always have an on clause (except for a cross join). –  Gordon Linoff Jun 25 '12 at 16:07

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