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Quick and silly jQuery selector question.

Why this does not work: jsFiddle demo

//config
var ThisTable = $('.ReallyLongSillyTableName');


// Function
$(ThisTable + ' > tbody > tr > td:last-child').each(function() {
    $(this).append('Sales Orders: ');
});

But, this does work: jsFiddle demo

$('.ReallyLongSillyTableName td:last-child').each(function() {
    $(this).append('Some Text');
});

Any suggestions much appreciated.

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2  
jsfiddle.net/4zhx6 –  CD.. Jun 25 '12 at 14:27
    
ThisTable is a reference to a table element in the DOM. You cannot concatenate it with a string. You might want to do something like ThisTable.find('selector_goes_here') [...] –  MilkyWayJoe Jun 25 '12 at 14:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can use either this:

$('tbody > tr > td:last-child', ThisTable).each(function() {
    $(this).append('Sales Orders: ');
});

or this:

ThisTable.find('tbody > tr > td:last-child').each(function() {
    $(this).append('Sales Orders: ');
});
share|improve this answer
    
this isn't quite the same - it doesn't restrict the tbody to being a direct child of ThisTable. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 14:29
    
@Alnitak - in which case it does not restrict to be a direct child? –  Iladarsda Jun 25 '12 at 14:32
    
@NewUser when there are other elements between .ReallyLongSillyTableName and any tbody descendent, e.g. if there were nested tables, or if the matched class was actually on some other element higher-up in the DOM, and not on a table. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 14:35
    
@Alnitak Sure you over complicate the situation. Of course we can use $("> tbody > ...", ThisTable) however it is deprecated. –  VisioN Jun 25 '12 at 14:45
    
@VisioN deprecated where? –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 14:47

$('.ReallyLongSillyTableName'); is a jQuery object, so you can't use it as String.

So try

var ThisTable = '.ReallyLongSillyTableName';


// Function
$(ThisTable + ' > tbody > tr > td:last-child').each(function() {
    $(this).append('Sales Orders: ');
});

$(ThisTable + ' td:last-child').each(function() {
    $(this).append('Some Text');
});

and you can use ThisTable as above or $(ThisTable) (to make it jquery object) for other purpose.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the only answer (so far) that correctly enforces the .tableClass > tbody parent-child relationship. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 14:31
    
@Alnitak Thanks Sir –  thecodeparadox Jun 25 '12 at 14:34
    
@thecodeparadox - where would you use this string as a jQuery object? Taking in count it is a single string. Can you think of any examples where this dual mode could be useful? Or is this just a side effect (beneficial in other cases than this)? Thanks –  Iladarsda Jun 25 '12 at 14:45
1  
@NewUser for example you can use $(ThisTable).filter(), here you can you jQuery object and so on. So use ThisTable as string or jquery object –  thecodeparadox Jun 25 '12 at 14:48
  1. var ThisTable = $('.ReallyLongSillyTableName'); is jQuery object (javascript object)

  2. $(ThisTable + ' > tbody > tr > td:last-child') here in () you have javascript object + string, that will not give you full string (NOT string + string!)

  3. You need var ThisTable = '.ReallyLongSillyTableName';

share|improve this answer

Try like below,

ThisTable.find('tbody > tr > td:last-child').each(function() {
    $(this).append('Sales Orders: ');
});
share|improve this answer

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