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I'm using Mysql 5.1, and have this query, is there a way to not use the subqueries and accomplish the same result?

SELECT oref.affiliate_id, ROUND(sum( oph.amount ) * 0.10 ,2) AS tsum
FROM operators_referer AS oref 
LEFT JOIN operators_payments_history AS oph 
ON oref.operator_id = oph.operator_id
WHERE oref.affiliate_id = 28221
AND
(
    oph.date_paid > 
    (
        SELECT MAX(aph.date_paid) 
        FROM affiliates_payments_history AS aph 
        WHERE aph.operator_id = oref.affiliate_id
    )
    OR 
    (
        SELECT MAX(aph.date_paid)
        FROM affiliates_payments_history AS aph 
        WHERE aph.operator_id = oref.affiliate_id 
    ) 
    is NULL
)
share|improve this question
    
Can you give an example of your data and your expected result? –  N West Jun 25 '12 at 14:47
    
Instead of ON oref.operator_id = oph.operator_id, you could use USING (operator_id). –  glglgl Jun 25 '12 at 14:48
    
@glglgl and that doesnt change anything.. –  nawfal Jun 25 '12 at 14:51
    
Not with respect to the question, right. That's why I chose to comment and not to answer. Bit it improves readability. –  glglgl Jun 25 '12 at 14:58
1  
@David Manheim, this is a part of a complex update, performance is a issue but more than that i want to know. –  Jmsegrev Jun 25 '12 at 15:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Don't Do it! If tables are indexed properly, and the database structure makes sense, you are almost definitely better off leaving this with subqueries. Per you comment, it seems as though this will simplify and speed things up - but that ain't necessarily so. The parser will not necessarily do a better job with a non-subquery form. The clarity of the subquery, and the complexity of a query re-written not to use subqueries, argues that this isn't a worthwhile goal.

You need-to-know-if-it-can-be-done? It can: Answers to this CS.stackexchange question show how to do so, and some point out that there is no way to have a subquery that cannot be written as a join-based query, with no possible set-differences. That means that there is a way to simplify it, and some links to algoithmic ways to do so are linked to.

share|improve this answer
    
Of course, you may still want to rewrite the query. –  David Manheim Jun 25 '12 at 15:36
1  
Thanks, great link. –  Jmsegrev Jun 25 '12 at 15:45
    
It was pointed out to me that, depending on the query optimizer, the particular subqueries here may be run one-row-at-a-time, instead of having the engine refactor it. If it is very slow, you can try one of the queries with HAVING. –  David Manheim Jun 26 '12 at 13:49

Have you tried a HAVING clause?

SELECT oref.affiliate_id, ROUND(sum( oph.amount ) * 0.10 ,2) AS tsum
FROM operators_referer AS oref 
LEFT JOIN operators_payments_history AS oph 
ON oref.operator_id = oph.operator_id
LEFT JOIN affiliates_payments_history AS aph
ON aph.operator_id = oref.affiliate_id
WHERE oref.affiliate_id = 28221
GROUP BY oref.affiliate_id
HAVING MAX(aph.date_paid) > oph.date_paid OR MAX(aph.date_paid) IS NULL
share|improve this answer
    
Having is just a sneaky way of creating a subquery. It does eliminate the syntax, but I think the database engine still sees it as a subquery - of course, this may be fine. –  David Manheim Jun 25 '12 at 15:59
SELECT MAX(aph.date_paid) AS max_aph, 
       oref.affiliate_id, 
       ROUND(sum( oph.amount ) * 0.10 ,2) AS tsum
FROM operators_referer AS oref 
LEFT JOIN operators_payments_history AS oph 
       ON oref.operator_id = oph.operator_id
LEFT JOIN affiliates_payments_history AS aph 
       ON aph.operator_id = oref.affiliate_id
WHERE oref.affiliate_id = 28221
AND (oph.date_paid > max_aph OR max_aph is NULL)

Not tried, but I think this is what you're searching.

share|improve this answer
    
This gives me an unknown column 'max_aph', for some reason the alias is not working down there. Any idea? –  Jmsegrev Jun 25 '12 at 15:14

What you are looking for is a simple JOIN logic.

like so:

SELECT oref.affiliate_id, ROUND(sum( oph.amount ) * 0.10 ,2) AS tsum
FROM operators_referer AS oref 
     LEFT JOIN operators_payments_history AS oph 
            ON oref.operator_id = oph.operator_id
     LEFT JOIN affiliates_payments_history AS aph
            ON aph.operator_id = oref.affiliate_id
WHERE oref.affiliate_id = 28221
AND ( oph.date_paid > MAX(aph.date_paid)
OR MAX(aph.date_paid) IS NULL)    
GROUP BY oref.affiliate_id;

what the query means is basically "join the aph and oph tables to oref, apply the max function only within the scope of the oref.affiliate_id, and look for rows where the conditions apply"

It would be wise to learn more about the JOIN and LEFT JOIN functionality in the MySQL manual

share|improve this answer
    
When running your query i get an 'invalid use of group function' error, i tried to arrange it but still no good, any hint? –  Jmsegrev Jun 25 '12 at 15:16
    
@Juanma - have you tried removing the oref.affiliate_id from the WHERE section? –  BigFatBaby Jun 25 '12 at 17:00
    
How would will i get the info for the specific id then? –  Jmsegrev Jun 25 '12 at 17:15

Try this::

  SELECT oref.affiliate_id, ROUND(sum( oph.amount ) * 0.10 ,2) AS tsum
    FROM operators_referer AS oref 
    LEFT JOIN operators_payments_history AS oph 
    ON oref.operator_id = oph.operator_id
   LEFT JOIN affiliates_payments_history AS aph ON aph.operator_id = oref.affiliate_id
    WHERE oref.affiliate_id = 28221
  GROUP BY oref.affiliate_id
  HAVING IFNULL(MAX(aph.date_paid),0 > oph.date_paid)
share|improve this answer
3  
Umm... didn't you still use a subquery here??? –  N West Jun 25 '12 at 14:46
    
-1 Your using a sub query, he asks for an answer which does not use one –  Sammaye Jun 25 '12 at 14:47
    
do you need the ifnull? If it's a left join isn't it returning the entire oref table, and all records that match in the right table regardless of if they are null or not? –  Hituptony Jun 25 '12 at 14:47
1  
But at least, the subquery is used only once. It is an improvement over the version in the question; IMO no need to -1. –  glglgl Jun 25 '12 at 14:48
    
Yes, but I cannot remove it, since the condition check is not for equality, but for >, Had it been for equality, could have joined that –  Sashi Kant Jun 25 '12 at 14:49

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