Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose, I want to make a class B with a pointer to another class A. In the constructor of A I want to construct B and passing it a pointer to this. In principle, this pointer can be a shared_ptr, correct? Then how do I make such a class with the assignment of the shared_ptr in the constructor?

I tried it in the code below. ClassB and ClassC are identical, with a pointer to ClassA which constructs instances of ClassB and ClassC. The only two differences are that ClassB holds a regular pointer and ClassC holds a shared_ptr to ClassA and that the code with ClassB is working and the code with ClassC is not. What am I doing wrong?

// Main.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.

#include "ClassA.h"
#include <iostream>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    std::cout << "Create B and C separately, without a reference to A:" << std::endl;
    ClassB(nullptr);
    ClassC(nullptr);

    std::cout << "Create A, and through it B and C:" << std::endl;
    ClassA A;

    A.PrintHello();
    A.getObjectB().getPointerToA()->PrintHello();

    A.PrintHello();
    A.getObjectC().getPointerToA()->PrintHello();
    return 0;
}

// ClassA.h

#pragma once

#include "ClassB.h"
#include "ClassC.h"

class ClassA
{
private:
    ClassB objectB;
    ClassC objectC;

public:
    ClassA(void);

    ClassB getObjectB() { return objectB; };
    ClassC getObjectC() { return objectC; };

    void PrintHello();
};

// ClassA.cpp

#include "ClassA.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

ClassA::ClassA(void) : objectB(ClassB( this )), objectC(ClassC( std::make_shared<ClassA>(*this) ))
{
    std::cout << "Class A fully constructed" << std::endl;
}

void ClassA::PrintHello()
{
    std::cout << "Hello" << std::endl;
}

// ClassB.h

#pragma once

#include <memory>

class ClassA;

class ClassB
{
private:
    ClassA* pointerToA;

public:
    ClassB(ClassA* pA);

    ClassA* getPointerToA() { return pointerToA; };
};

// ClassB.cpp

#include "ClassB.h"
#include <iostream>

ClassB::ClassB(ClassA* pA) : pointerToA(pA)
{
    std::cout << "Class B constructed" << std::endl;
}

// ClassC.h

#pragma once

#include <memory>

class ClassA;

class ClassC
{
private:
    std::shared_ptr<ClassA> pointerToA;

public:
    ClassC(std::shared_ptr<ClassA> pA);

    std::shared_ptr<ClassA> getPointerToA() { return pointerToA; };
};

// ClassC.cpp

#include "ClassC.h"
#include <iostream>

ClassC::ClassC(std::shared_ptr<ClassA> pA) : pointerToA(pA)
{
    std::cout << "Class C constructed" << std::endl;
}
share|improve this question
    
@sbi I'd assume so –  sehe Jun 27 '12 at 18:44
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

These are not doing the same thing:

ClassA::ClassA(void) : objectB(ClassB( this )), objectC(ClassC( std::make_shared<ClassA>(*this) ))

The first initializer creates a temporary of type ClassB with the this pointer and initializes objectB by copying that temporary:

objectB(ClassB( this ))

The second creates a new ClassA as a copy of *this, stores it in a shared_ptr, then initializes a temporary ClassC with that shared_ptr, then initializes objectC by copying that temporary:

objectC(ClassC( std::make_shared<ClassA>(*this) ))

Your syntax is unnecessarily verbose, avoid the temporaries and copies and initialize your members directly:

    objectB( this ), objectC( std::make_shared<ClassA>(*this) )

This is equivalent to:

    objectB( this ), objectC( std::shared_ptr<ClassA>( new ClassA(*this) ) )

It should be clear that objectB has a pointer to this but objectB has a (shared) pointer to a different object, that is a copy of *this.

The point of a shared_ptr is it owns the pointer you give it, and will (generally) delete the pointer. You can't have a shared_ptr that owns this in an object's constructor, because until the object has finished being constructed it can't be owned by any shared_ptr (the pointer you give to a shared_ptr is a pointer to a complete object, not a partially constructed one half way through it's constructor) so there's no safe way to get a shared_ptr referring to this that you can pass to objectC's constructor. There is a way to do it, using the aliasing feature of shared_ptr but I think you should re-examine your design and ask why you want objectC to "own" the object it's part of ... that doesn't make sense.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes a lot of sense, thanks! I indeed don't want that objectC "owns" objectA, it is the other way around. I do want however that objectC knows its "owner", and therefore it needs some reference to objectA. Is it best practice then to use a general pointer for it? –  physicalattraction Jun 27 '12 at 10:43
    
@physicalattraction, yes, a simple pointer is fine if you don't need to own the thing it points to, and you know the pointer will always remain valid. In your case the parent object will always outlive its sub-objects, so it's safe for the sub-objects to store a ClassA* to their parent. –  Jonathan Wakely Jun 27 '12 at 10:46
add comment

std::make_shared allocates and initializes a new object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.