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A function in javascript forms a closure by keeping a (hidden) link to its enclosing scope.

Is it possible to access it programmatically when we have the function (as a variable value) ?

The real goal is theoretical but a demonstration could be to list the properties of the closure.

var x = (function(){
   var y = 5;
   return function() {
       alert(y);
   };
})();

//access y here with x somehow
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Code sample would better explain your exact problem –  Blaster Jun 25 '12 at 16:01
1  
@Blaster: Try it. It won't work. y isn't a property on x. –  Matt Jun 25 '12 at 16:05
1  
@Blaster that's because that's what the "x" function does. Your example would have also logged 5 on the console. –  Pointy Jun 25 '12 at 16:06
1  
@Blaster: That's the alert(y) that's showing you 5. The console.log() shows TypeError: Cannot read property 'y' of undefined –  Matt Jun 25 '12 at 16:06
3  
Ok thanks guys makes sense now :) –  Blaster Jun 25 '12 at 16:08
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

That's (one of) the purpose(s) of a closure - to keep information private. Since the function already has been executed its scope variables are no longer available from outside (and have never been) - only the functions executed in it's scope (still) have access.

However you could give access via getters/setters.

You might want to take a look into Stuart Langridge's talk about closures. Very recommendable are also Douglas Crockfords Explanations. You can do lots of fancy stuff with closures;)

Edit: You have several options to examine the closure: Watch the object in the webdeveloper console or (as I do it often) return a debug-function which dumps out all the private variables to the console.

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No, not unless you expose it:

var x = function(){
        var y = 5;

        return {             
           getY: function(){
              return y;
          },
          setY: function(newY){
             y = newY;
          }    
       }
   }


    x.setY(4);
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You can edit the alert function:

var x = (function(){
   var y = 5;
   return function() {
       alert(y);
   };
})();

var oldAlert = alert;

alert = function (x) {
    oldAlert(x);
    window.y = x;
}

x();

console.log(y); // 5

Or if you own the code, you can use standart getters and setters.

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6  
Heh, + 1 for thinking outside the box. I think the OP wants to be able to inspect all variables in the closure though. –  Matt Jun 25 '12 at 16:10
    
I just want to make the point, that closures aren't entirely black box. –  jasssonpet Jun 25 '12 at 16:11
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