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I have a strange problem. I have this method, which should generate a Date out of the name of a directory.

private Date getSubfolderDate(File file) {
    String name = file.getName();
    SimpleDateFormat parser = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-YY");
    Date date;
    try {
        date = parser.parse(name);
    } catch (ParseException e) {
        return null;
    }
    return date;
}

it returns for String name = "17-06-12": "Mon Jan 02 00:00:00 CET 2012"

and for String name = "18-06-12": "Mon Jan 02 00:00:00 CET 2012"

Why?

Later i am comparing these with the compareTo(Date xy) and it returns 0, so it has to be the same.....

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your format is also incorrect it should be dd-MM-yy (for 17-06-12), To tracedown the issue check the catch block with printStackTrace()

Also

SimpleDateFormat parses date from String the resultant Date will invoke toString() that have fixed format

So if you wish to print formatted date again you need to use simpleDateFormat.format(dateInstance)

Date class doesn't have any property that holds the format to be printed in toString()

share|improve this answer
    
Why are you referring to toString() – Leander Jun 25 '12 at 16:43
    
While printing date in System.out.println(dateInstance); it will invoke dateInstance.toString() and so the output – Jigar Joshi Jun 25 '12 at 16:44
    
I read the dates from eclipse....i have never called System.out.println(dateInstance); but the compareTo method also produces 0 – Leander Jun 25 '12 at 16:45
    
It will do the same – Jigar Joshi Jun 25 '12 at 16:46
    
okay, I did not know that ;)...Thank you – Leander Jun 25 '12 at 16:49

I tried this code:

static Date getSubfolderDate(File file) {
  String name = file.getName();
  SimpleDateFormat parser = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yy");
  Date date;
  try {
    date = parser.parse(name);
  } catch (ParseException e) {
    return null;
  }
  return date;
}
public static void main(String[] args) {
  System.out.println(getSubfolderDate(new File("17-06-12")));
  System.out.println(getSubfolderDate(new File("18-06-12")));
}

It prints

Sun Jun 17 00:00:00 CEST 2012
Mon Jun 18 00:00:00 CEST 2012
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah the Upper case Y was the problem – Leander Jun 25 '12 at 16:53
    
However, the code you provide did not produce the output you posted; it threw an exception that stated Illegal pattern character 'Y' This might be telling me that there is bad exception handling at work in your code. The best way to handle exceptions is not to handle them, except for wrapping checked exceptions into a RuntimeException and rethrowing. – Marko Topolnik Jun 25 '12 at 16:56
    
The problem is that there are folders which are named after dates and folders who are not.....date == null is later used to indentify whether it is named after a date, which will be treated differently than the others. Normally the exceptions are desired – Leander Jun 25 '12 at 17:37
    
I didn't have that exception in mind, but the exception I mentioned just now -- the one thrown by new SimpleDateFormat. This is not covered by the try-block in the code you posted, and apparently you didn't see it. – Marko Topolnik Jun 25 '12 at 18:16
    
the method is surrounded by a try/catch with the catch of a "normal" Exception. I have done this because nearly all the other code is either IO or my methods, which are throwing the standard exception.... but the catch should open an JOptionPane o.O – Leander Jun 25 '12 at 20:06

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