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I just wanna know, when a suffix tree is superior to an enhanced suffix array.

After reading Replacing suffix trees with enhanced suffix arrays i don't see a reason to use suffix trees anymore. Some methods can get complicated, but you can do everything with a suffix array, what you can do with a suffix tree and you need the same time complexity but less memory.

A survey even showed, that suffix arrays are faster, because they are cache friendlier, and don't produce as much cache misses, then suffix trees (so the cache can predict the array usage much better, then on the recursive tree structure).

So, does anyone know a reason to choose a suffix tree over a suffix array?

edit Ok, if you know more tell me, so far its:

  • Suffixarrays dont allow on-line construction
  • Some pattern matching algorithms run faster on Suffixtrees
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3  
Simpler implementation? –  Niklas B. Jun 25 '12 at 17:29
    
Just a guess but Suffix Trees could be smaller in terms of memory in actual implementation. –  Justin Jun 25 '12 at 17:39
    
@Justin: No, in fact enhanced suffix arrays consume less memory, which is what the linked paper is all about –  Niklas B. Jun 25 '12 at 17:41
    
Hmm, i don't know. If i compare Ukkonen's suffixtree construction to a linear time suffix array construction, it's not easier imo. And if you just look at the simplest construction, its easier to understand to sort a list of suffixes then to arrange them in a tree, or? –  Nicolas Jun 25 '12 at 18:05
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3 Answers

There are some interesting thoughts on the subject in SO itself. You can also find more technical material available on line. There is another paper that might help you with your issues, claiming to be another efficient way to implement these structures.

I am not an expert in the issue, but it seems to me that suffix arrays may be somewhat slower, even though they are more space efficient. Nevertheless, I lack the practical experience to be more detailed about both of them.

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I have developed code using "bucket" or "map" methodology. e.g. for string "banab" Starting character is 'b' so bucket of 'b' with value "anab" ('b' is node value) Then next substring is "anab". So bucket of 'a' with value "nab" ('a' is node value)

Similarly another bucket 'n' for value "anab"

Now next string is "ab". We already have bucket for 'a' with value "anab".

So we will create subbuckets

Bucket 'a' -> sub-bucket 'n' with value "ab" (starting "a" and "n" are from bucket) Bucket 'a' -> sub-bucket 'b' with value null (starting "a" from bucket )

If there was substring "anan..". Then we would have repeated steps Bucket 'a' -> sub-bucket 'n' -> sub-sub-bucket 'a' and so on

Refer my code for word "banana". It prints value as expected. 5 a 3 ana 1 anana 0 banana 4 na 2 nana

Refer my code at :- http://ideone.com/TBhfxI

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.HashMap;




public class StringSuffixArray {


public static void main(String[] args) {
    String input = "banana";
    NodeMap nodeMapObj = new NodeMap();
    for(int i=0;i<input.length();i++){
        nodeMapObj.add(i,input.substring(i));
    }
    nodeMapObj.print();
    System.out.println("done");

}


}
class Result{
int index;
String val;
public Result(int index,String val) {
    this.index=index;
    this.val=val;
}
@Override
public String toString() {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub
    return  index +" " + val;
}
}

class Node{
int index;
Character charValue=null;
String stringValue;
NodeMap map;
public ArrayList<Result> getStrings(){
    ArrayList<Result> mapList = new ArrayList<Result>();
    // Print node alphabetically
    if(map==null){
        if(stringValue!=null){
            Result r1= new Result(this.index,charValue + stringValue);
            mapList.add(r1);
        }else{
            Result r1= new Result(this.index, charValue+"");
            mapList.add(r1);
        }
    }else{
        // Map is not null. So print all all the map contents
        if(map.get(null)!=null && map.get(null).charValue==null){
            Result r1= new Result(map.get(null).index,charValue+"");
            mapList.add(r1);
        }           
        for( char ch = 'a' ; ch <= 'z' ; ch++ ){
               Node node = map.get(ch);
               if(node !=null){
                   ArrayList<Result>  internalList = node.getStrings();          
                   for(Result str:internalList){
                       Result r1= new Result(str.index,charValue+str.val);
                       mapList.add(r1);
                   }
               }
        }
    }
    return mapList;
}

}

class NodeMap{
HashMap<Character,Node> map;

public void add(int index,String inputString){
 if(inputString != null){
    if(map==null){
        // First time call. Create Map and add String
        map = new HashMap<Character,Node>();
    }
    // Map already present check if character already there
    Node charNode = map.get(inputString.charAt(0));
    if(charNode==null){
        // Character not present in map. Add map entry
        Node node = new Node();
        node.charValue=inputString.charAt(0);
        node.index = index;
        if(inputString.length()>1){
             node.stringValue=inputString.substring(1);
        }else{
            node.stringValue=null;
        }
        node.map=null;
        map.put(inputString.charAt(0), node);           
    }else{ // Character present 
        // Check if map of node is already populated. if yes, just add input string in that map 
        // If map is not present; then create map. Add existing value in map. and then add new string in map 
        // This is node of first character of input string. So sub-map should be for second character
        if(charNode.map==null){
            // Node does not have map.  So create sub-map.
            charNode.map = new NodeMap();
            charNode.map.add(charNode.index,charNode.stringValue);
        }
        if(inputString.length()>1){
            charNode.map.add(index,inputString.substring(1));
        }else{
            charNode.map.add(index,null);
        }

        charNode.stringValue=null;
    }
}else{
    // Add a null node. Indicating end of string
    Node n = new Node();
    n.index=index;
    n.charValue=null;
    map.put(null,n);
}
}
public Node get(Character ch){
    return map.get(ch);
}

public void print(){
    // Map is not null. So print all all the map contents
    ArrayList<Result> finalArray= new ArrayList<Result>();
    for( char ch = 'a' ; ch <= 'z' ; ch++ ){
        Node node = map.get(ch);
        if(node!=null){
            finalArray.addAll(node.getStrings());
        }
    }

    for(Result rs : finalArray){
        System.out.println(rs);
    }
}
}
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Another example to show that a suffix tree is superior:

You can easily construct a suffix array if you have a suffix tree already.

But it's much more complicated to construct a suffix tree from a suffix array.

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