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I'm looking for help explaining the following syntax. I have checked my Perl book, and checked around online.

I'm looking for the following:

$option =~ s/\s+//g
$option =~ m/^\s*$

Many thanks.

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2  
perldoc.perl.org/perlretut.html –  Wooble Jun 25 '12 at 17:47

2 Answers 2

s and m are operators that apply regular expressions to a string. s/// is the substitution operator and m// is the match operator. They both take a regular expression as their first arguement (inside the //). The =~ tells Perl to use/match the regex against $option. See perlre for more info on that.

Here's what these regex do:

use warnings;
use strict;
use YAPE::Regex::Explain;
print YAPE::Regex::Explain->new( qr/\s+/ )->explain;

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:\s+)
matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \s+                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (1 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------

In short: it replaces every instance of whitespace-characters that has more than one of them with nothing.

And:

print YAPE::Regex::Explain->new( qr/^\s*$/ )->explain;

The regular expression:

(?-imsx:^\s*$)

matches as follows:

NODE                     EXPLANATION
----------------------------------------------------------------------
(?-imsx:                 group, but do not capture (case-sensitive)
                         (with ^ and $ matching normally) (with . not
                         matching \n) (matching whitespace and #
                         normally):
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  ^                        the beginning of the string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  \s*                      whitespace (\n, \r, \t, \f, and " ") (0 or
                           more times (matching the most amount
                           possible))
----------------------------------------------------------------------
  $                        before an optional \n, and the end of the
                           string
----------------------------------------------------------------------
)                        end of grouping
----------------------------------------------------------------------

And that one matches if the string contains only whitespace characters. As many as possible, but at least zero of them, and nothing else.

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Thanks for the quick responce., You guys have been very helpfull as usuall. Thanks very much. –  user1475436 Jun 25 '12 at 18:10
1  
"These are regular expressions." Actually s/// and m// are both operators. It's their first arguments that are regular expressions. It's a subtle distinction - but important. –  Dave Cross Jun 26 '12 at 9:34
    
You are correct of course. I'll edit the answer to reflect that. Thanks Dave. –  simbabque Jun 26 '12 at 9:38

Well, the first expression is a s(ubstitution) that looks for one or more whitespaces and eliminates them. the + specifies one or more whitespace (\s) characters.

The second looks to m(atch) an empty line. The ^ anchors tje match to the beginning of the line and the $ to the end. Hence only lines that contain zero or more (i.e. *) whitespaces are successfully matched.

Both expressions operate against the $option variable since the =~ binds them to it.

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Thanks for the quick responce –  user1475436 Jun 25 '12 at 18:09

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