Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a query that looks like this:

SELECT
    hd.definition_id,
    hd.sun_end < hd.sun_start AS sunEndFirst,
    (IF (
        hd.sun_end IS NULL,
        0,
        IF(
            hd.sun_start IS NULL,
            0,
            IF(hd.sun_end = hd.sun_start, 24, time_to_sec(timediff(hd.sun_end, hd.sun_start)) / 60)
        )
    ))
FROM audit_hour_definition AS hd
WHERE hd.definition_id = 5
ORDER BY hd.definition_id

When the two times are equal (e.g. 09:00:00-09:00:00), the query works. When the start and end times are on the same day (e.g. 02:00:00-16:00:00), the query works. When the start and end times stretch across the midnight marker, the query breaks down. For example, 18:00:00-06:00:00 returns -720, when we want 12.

Does anyone have any nice methods for dealing with this problem?

EDIT: All time columns use MySQL's TIME data type.

share|improve this question
    
Please, post the definition of the table. I suppose you're using TIME and not TIMESTAMP types? –  vyegorov Jun 25 '12 at 18:19
    
@vyegorov Yes - that is correct. The *_end and *_start columns are using the TIME data type. –  webjawns.com Jun 25 '12 at 18:20

3 Answers 3

It is highly recommended to avoid using just TIME for the cases when you're logging some events. Exactly for this kind of cases. And this will be the best solution to your case, as simply changing the type will eliminate all the transformations.

If for some reasons this is not possible, then you need to build timestamp somehow, i.e. you need a date part. If it's not there, then how can you be sure, that 18:00:00-06:00:00 yields 12 hours and not 36?

Still, you can use the following construct:

SELECT
    hd.definition_id,
    hd.sun_end < hd.sun_start AS sunEndFirst,
    IF(hd.sun_end IS NULL OR hd.sun_start IS NULL,
       0,
       IF(hd.sun_end = hd.sun_start, 24,
         time_to_sec(timediff(
           IF(hd.sun_end > hd.sun_start, hd.sun_end,
                hd.sun_end + cast('24:00:00' as time)),
           hd.sun_start)) / 60
        )
    )
  FROM audit_hour_definition AS hd
 WHERE hd.definition_id = 5
 ORDER BY hd.definition_id;
share|improve this answer

Ah, knew it was there. subtime might do what you want?

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/date-and-time-functions.html#function_subtime

Edited to add: You need one more division. Your time to sec returns seconds, dividing once by 60 gives you minutes. Divide again by 60 to get hours.

Maybe this might work?:

SELECT
    hd.definition_id,
    hd.sun_end < hd.sun_start AS sunEndFirst,
    (IF (
    hd.sun_end IS NULL,
    0,
    IF(
        hd.sun_start IS NULL,
        0,
        IF(hd.sun_end = hd.sun_start, 24, 
              IF (hd.sun_end > hd.sun_start, time_to_sec(timediff(hd.sun_end, hd.sun_start)) / 3600), time_to_sec(timediff(hd.sun_start, hd.sun_end))/3600))
    )
))
FROM audit_hour_definition AS hd
WHERE hd.definition_id = 5
ORDER BY hd.definition_id
share|improve this answer
    
Ha. Don't I feel smart. Thanks for pointing that out the division issue. :) –  webjawns.com Jun 25 '12 at 18:52
    
I get bitten by it all the time. We still run legacy clipper apps, and do a lot of time division. Alternatively you can just divide by 3600 to get hours. –  JohnP Jun 25 '12 at 18:55
    
I checked out SUBTIME(), but it appears to suffer from the same problem. –  webjawns.com Jun 25 '12 at 19:00
    
I think I found a solution... adding 24 hours when end time is less than start time. –  webjawns.com Jun 25 '12 at 19:09
    
Maybe cast the returned answer as an absolute value? Alternatively, you could just nest the IF to include a subtraction flipped the other way when the end is less than start. –  JohnP Jun 25 '12 at 19:10
up vote 0 down vote accepted

With some insight from @vyegorov, I arrived at the following query.

SELECT hd.definition_id, IF(
        hd.sun_end IS NULL OR hd.sun_start IS NULL,
        0,
        IF(
            hd.sun_end = hd.sun_start,
            24,
            IF(
                hd.sun_end < hd.sun_start,
                24 + (time_to_sec(timediff(
                    hd.sun_end,
                    hd.sun_start
                )) / 3600),
                time_to_sec(timediff(
                    hd.sun_end,
                    hd.sun_start
                )) / 3600
            )
        ))
FROM audit_hour_definition AS hd

This query will return the correct number of hours for a given weekday.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.