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I'm writing JUnit tests for a service that creates and acts on an entity in a variety of ways. I want my tests to try lots of different combinations of activity. I have something like this:

test1() {
/** create entity **/
/** assert **/
}

test2() {
/** do X to entity **/
/** assert **/
}

test3() {
/** do X again to entity, expect failure **/
/** assert **/
}

test4() {
/** do Y to entity, expect success **/
/** assert **/
}

However, my understanding is I cannot expect JUnit to run the tests in the correct order, and that each test should be totally self contained.

But if I make every test self contained, then there's a lot of duplicate code, things run rather long, and it's more difficult to maintain ... for example:

test1() {
/** create entity **/
/** assert **/
}

test2() {
/** create entity **/
/** do X to entity **/
/** assert **/
}

test3() {
/** create entity **/
/** do X to entity **/
/** do X again to entity, expect failure **/
/** assert **/
}

test4() {
/** create entity **/
/** do X to entity **/
/** do X again to entity, expect failure **/
/** do Y to entity, expect success **/
/** assert **/
}

... if you follow me.

So my question is, what's the "correct" way to write these tests so the code is clean and elegant?

Thanks, Rob

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2  
May I suggest option #3 where you only have test4(){...} with more asserts to document where the failure is. –  sam Jun 25 '12 at 18:20
1  
@sam surely you are not suggesting multiple asserts in one JUnit test? correct? even junit.sourceforge.net/doc/faq/faq.htm#tests_12 recommends one assert per test –  Ross Larson Jun 26 '12 at 14:55
    
I am suggesting that, yes. :) I don't think that recommendation is helpful given what the Robert Hume is testing. You could say that another testing framework should be used for testing a sequence of events or a particular use scenario. You could also build a Test Runner that maintains order within a test case, but that breaks another FAQ. Good thoughts, though. –  sam Jun 26 '12 at 15:13
    
fair enough, I guess if doing X to entity only should fail on second invocation it may be the only way to guarantee good results. I guess downside is you possible need n iterations to uncover all bugs given a test case with n asserts –  Ross Larson Jun 26 '12 at 15:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could call a setup method in each test method to handle the duplicate code.

i.e.

test1() {
setup();
/** create entity **/
/** assert **/
}

test2() {
setup();
/** create entity **/
/** do X to entity **/
/** assert **/
}

setup(){
/**perform setup here*/
}
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You could use @Before annotated method to initialize the entity to be used in the tests. Then, use @After annotated method to clear/release any resources used by your test.

You could have:

private Entity entity;

@Before
public void init() {
  entity = ...
}

@Test
public void test1() {
  // do things to entity
  ...
}
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But if a series of test should start from checking the connection, you can't put this check in the "before" clause. –  Gangnus Sep 18 '13 at 6:53

Which is more readable for you?

@OrderRunner
public class EntityTest {
  Entity e;

  shouldBeCreatedInValidState() {
    e = new Entity();
    assert(e.isValid());
  }

  shouldBeWigglable() {
    e.wiggle();
    assert(e.hasBeenWiggled());
  }

  shouldNotBeWigglableTwice() {
    try {
       e.wiggle();
       fail("Wiggled too many times")
    } catch(OverWiggledException e) {}
  }
}

or

public class EnttityTest {
  shouldBeCreatedInValidState() {
    Entity e = new Entity();
    assert(e.isValid());
  }

  shouldBeWigglable() {
    Entity e = new Entity();
    e.wiggle();
    assert(e.hasBeenWiggled());
  }

  shouldNotBeWigglableTwice() {
    Entity e = new Entity();
    e.wiggle();
    try {
       e.wiggle();
       fail("Wiggled too many times")
    } catch(OverWiggledException e) {}
  }
}

My preference is the latter. The attribute is easy to miss so the second "wiggle" looks like a single wiggle on a causal glance over the test.

And if the setup/test method is more complicated then create methods.

  shouldNotBeWigglableTwice() {
    givenAnEntity();
    andIWiggleIt();
    try {
       whenIWiggleIt();
       thenItShouldThrowAnException();
    } catch(OverWiggledException e) {}
  }
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