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I'm having a real hard time finding an elegant solution for this. Was surprised that jQuery doesn't contain an "&" or ":and" operator within a selector.

I am building a tag filtering mechanism. I want to reduce the result set based on the tags selected. So I pass in a tag query, and would like to show ONLY those elements that have children tags in the section which match the selector.

Problem:
I need to return a div ONLY IF it has all the matching child selectors. This code shows me the COMBINED results of each selector inside tag_query. I need the only those nodes that match all the selectors. This code below returns any div that has a child of .blue OR .green OR .button (instead of AND).

var tag_query = ".green, .blue, .button";
nodes_to_show = $(".results .element .tags").children(tag_query);
console.log(nodes_to_show);

What is currently happening on the UI side: I select 1 tag '.green' and I see only those elements with those tags. Then I add the '.blue' tag and I see a larger set (I expect to see a smaller one) because it also fetched any elements with a tag of '.blue'. I expect to only see the elements with BOTH '.blue' and '.green' tags.

This is the tag structure:

<div class="element">
    <div class="tags">
        <span class="item green">green</span>
        <span class="item button">button</span>
        <span class="item blue">blue</span>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="element">
    <div class="tags">
        <span class="item red">green</span>
        <span class="item button">button</span>
        <span class="item fire">blue</span>
    </div>
</div>

<div class="element">
    <div class="tags">
        <span class="item fire">fire</span>
        <span class="item button">button</span>
    </div>
</div>

Querying for the '.button' tag should return all three 'element' divs above. Querying for '.fire', and '.button' should return the last 2 'element' divs.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
    
What would you like nodes_to_show to contain? .element nodes or .tags nodes? –  BoltClock Jun 25 '12 at 19:31
    
It's a list. Use UL and LI elements. –  Šime Vidas Jun 25 '12 at 19:44
    
@BoltClock My goal is to run a .show() on the .element node. I don't really care which it returns. Currently after I fetch the .tags node, I run a .parents('.element').show() –  Jamis Charles Jun 25 '12 at 19:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here:

var arr = tag_query.split( ', ' );

$( '.element' ).filter(function () {
    var root = this;
    return arr.every(function ( className ) {
        return $( root ).find( className ).length > 0;
    });
}).show();

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/DjS2u/1/

So, for each .element element, I test if it contains at least one descendant for each fo the provided class-names. I convert the tag_query string into an array - the string form is not very useful, and on the array I can invoke array methods - in this case every().


Alternative solution:

var arr = tag_query.split( ', ' );

$( '.element' ).filter(function () {
    var $desc = $( this ).find( '*' );
    return arr.every(function ( className ) {
        return $desc.is( className );
    });
}).show();

Live demo: http://jsfiddle.net/DjS2u/2/

share|improve this answer
    
That worked wonderfully. Thanks. –  Jamis Charles Jun 25 '12 at 21:17
    
@JamisCharles Note how the every() array method is not implemented in IE8, for which you'll have to provide ES5-shim (via conditional comments, for instance). –  Šime Vidas Jun 25 '12 at 21:21

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