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I have the following array in PHP:

Array
(
    [0] => Array
        (
            [id] => 0
            [name] => name1
            [short_name] => n1
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [id] => 2
            [name] => name2
            [short_name] => n2
        )
)

I want to JSON encode it as a JSON array, producing a string like the following:

[  
    {  
        "id":0,
        "name":"name1",
        "short_name":"n1"
    },
    {  
        "id":2,
        "name":"name2",
        "short_name":"n2"
    }
]

But when I call json_encode on this array, I get the following:

{  
    "0":{  
        "id":0,
        "name":"name1",
        "short_name":"n1"
    },
    "2":{  
        "id":2,
        "name":"name2",
        "short_name":"n2"
    }
}

which is an object instead of an array.

How can I get json_encode to encode my array as an array, instead?

share|improve this question
    
Since Boris's answer was made nonsensical by your edits to the question, would you please accept Nguyễn Văn Vinh's answer instead, which addresses the question in its present form? This page is just going to cause confusion when future visitors arrive at it. Given that it has over 70000 views, we should try to make it into a coherent Q&A pair, which it currently isn't due to Boris's answer addressing an old version of your question. – Mark Amery Nov 27 '15 at 14:16
    
Why did you revert my edit? What change in there did you object to? In reverting it, you've made the title less clear, reintroduced English errors, made the formatting of the two JSON structures different so that they cannot be easily compared, reintroduced an answer to the question (where it does not belong) and reintroduced huge amounts of cruft. I see from the edit history that you also did this a year ago (although I'd forgotten about the question since then). On neither occasion have you explained yourself in the edit summary. Why? – Mark Amery Nov 28 '15 at 19:42
    
I've rolled back the rollbacks and locked the post for now; please take this dispute to Meta Stack Overflow if you disagree with the edits made to the post to help make it useful for future visitors of this page. – Martijn Pieters Nov 29 '15 at 22:29
up vote 36 down vote accepted

You are observing this behaviour because your array is not sequential - it has keys 0 and 2, but doesn't have 1 as a key.

Just having numeric indexes isn't enough. json_encode will only encode your PHP array as a JSON array if your PHP array is sequential - that is, if its keys are 0, 1, 2, 3, ...

You can reindex your array sequentially using the array_values function to get the behaviour you want. For example, the code below works successfully in your use case:

echo json_encode(array_values($input)).
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is a clear answer that worked for me in a similar situation! – And Finally Oct 23 '14 at 19:25
1  
+1 for a clean, one line solution. However, props still to Boris for illustrating the solution "long hand" – jacobross85 Nov 11 '14 at 19:40
    
but what if keys 0,2 are important ? I'm in same situation where I can't reindex array. – shyammakwana.me Dec 4 '15 at 6:44
    
JSON does not support associative array. refer: tools.ietf.org/html/rfc7159#section-5 – Nguyễn Văn Vinh Jan 6 at 15:45

Array in JSON are indexed array only, so the structure you're trying to get is not valid Json/Javascript.

PHP Associatives array are objects in JSON, so unless you don't need the index, you can't do such conversions.

If you want to get such structure you can do:

$indexedOnly = array();

foreach ($associative as $row) {
    $indexedOnly[] = array_values($row);
}

json_encode($indexedOnly);

Will returns something like:

[
     [0, "name1", "n1"],
     [1, "name2", "n2"],
]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for giving me the clue of indexed array :) the problem was i indexed it in such a way that the id was also the id of the array instead of a sequential id and json_encode didn't pick it up as an array but as in object instead because the array wasn't sequential its fixed now thanks for all your help guys :) – peplamb Jun 25 '12 at 19:30
    
Not true. Some libraries do encode associative arrays as arrays with index as one of element properties. – Gustavo Pinent Jun 18 '13 at 1:11
    
I don't understand what you mean - the array in Martin's answer is non indexed, and that's valid JSON. – And Finally Oct 23 '14 at 19:26
    
@AndFinally, the array in Martin's answer is actually indexed, implicitly. Omitting index results in an indexed array starting from zero. – Boris Guéry Apr 6 '15 at 21:19
    
Ah thanks Boris. – And Finally Apr 14 '15 at 9:57

The format you want is not a valid JSON, because there are no associative arrays in JavaScript. I tried to encode the same array as you and it gave me:

[
    {"id":0,"name":"name1","short_name":"n2"},
    {"id":1,"name":"name2","short_name":"n2"}
]

which is correct. (PHP 5.3.10)

share|improve this answer
    
This answer has been obsoleted by the OP's edits to the question. – Mark Amery Nov 26 '15 at 19:33

Try this,

<?php
$arr1=array('result1'=>'abcd','result2'=>'efg'); 
$arr2=array('result1'=>'hijk','result2'=>'lmn'); 
$arr3=array($arr1,$arr2); 
print (json_encode($arr3)); 
?>
share|improve this answer

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