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Is there any way to simulate changes in signal strength on the android emulator. I have a phonestatelistener logging signal strength in my app. I'm also using telnet to the emulator and commands like gsm signal 5 5, but I keep getting 99 as my rssi signal strength and -1 as the bit error rate.

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Are you looking specifically to change the signal strength or choke the speed of the network connection? – hwrdprkns Jun 25 '12 at 19:11
    
change the signal strength, I just don't understand why theres a gsm signal command in telnet that doesnt seem to be working with the emulator. – MEURSAULT Jun 25 '12 at 19:13

I think it's good idea to mock with interface in such cases

interface SignalInformation{
    float signalStrength();
    //etc...
}

Create some dummy class for mocking, and then change it to real working class.

class MockSignal implements SignalInformation{

    public float signalStrength(){
        return 3.5; //or whatever behaviour you want (i.e. random number)
    }
}

Well, I hope you got the idea.

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I don't think it's possible to do it in the emulator.

Source

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I got that link too when I searched google. However, if you telnet to the emulator and do a list, theres a command called gsm signal. Does that mean this command only works on devices? I thought the whole point of the telnet commands was to simulate device changes... – MEURSAULT Jun 25 '12 at 19:17
    
Correct, it probably is for different devices that have different power (dB) ratings for different networks. It might be harder to implement something like this on an emulator. – hwrdprkns Jun 25 '12 at 19:19
    
You can of course patch the emulator to do whatever you want... it would be a fairly simple hack to make the API return a value from a property or even a file stuck somewhere on the data partition. Most of the work would just be setting up to rebuild it (or doing the patch without rebuilding the whole thing). It might be simpler to just wrap the api within your code though, and test it once on a real device - maybe try using an anti-static bag as a marginal faraday cage. – Chris Stratton Jun 25 '12 at 19:22
    
just out of curiosity, how would one go about patching the emulator to do something like this (I'm probably just going to end up cloning the functionality in my own class for testing on the emulator and hook up to the real listener when on a device though). Still just wondering. – MEURSAULT Jun 25 '12 at 19:27
    
Take a look at how to contribute on tools.android.com – hwrdprkns Jun 25 '12 at 19:59

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