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Haskell have indentation based style for blocks. I know two styles but I can't decide what style is better. (Forgive me a really stupid example function)

1st - pretty:

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA n = if n == 0
            then putStrLn "zero"
            else do putStr "--> "
                    print n

This style looks great, but it is very fragile: let's refactor this code and rename funcA - we need to reindent then, else and all expressions in the do. Same for rename of n. It is annoying. Very.

EDIT As FUZxxl mentioned, lines gets more and more long, but most of them - spaces at the start.

Another style is refactoring friendly, but not so pretty:

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA n = if n == 0
    then putStrLn "zero"
    else do
        putStr "zero"
        print n

What style do you prefer and why? Probably you have another or you have a link to codestyle of some great developers with explanations?

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If you're worried about refactoring, why not think a bit longer about the function's name before you write it? While hacking on a bit of code, it's usually the best thing to drop most formatting for productivity. –  FUZxxl Jun 25 '12 at 19:27
1  
Johan Tibell’s style guide have a section on if-then-else clauses. –  JJJ Jun 25 '12 at 20:52
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2 Answers 2

I still haven't figured out my "ideal" Haskell style. The way I tend to write code currently is probably most heavily influenced by coding in Python and Mercury.

I tend to like multi-line structures to have an obvious "header" line that tells me what the structure is without a close reading (this generally means the "shape" of the multi-line structure should be determined by the very start or very end of the "header" line), and to have the different "component parts" of a multi-line structure with several distinct multi-line parts clearly delineated by changing indentation. So I would be much more likely to write your example as:

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA n =
    if n == 0 then
        putStrLn "zero"
    else
        do  putStr "--> "
            print n

Or possibly:

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA n =
    if n == 0 then
        putStrLn "zero"
    else do
        putStr "--> "
        print n

with the else and do folded onto the same line (though in that case I start a new line after the do). Similarly a function whose entire definition is a do block usually has the do immediately following the = in the function header, and the actual code of the do block following in an indented set of lines.

If the condition of the if/then/else was more complicated, I would give that its own "section" as well, becoming:

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA n =
    if
        n == 0
    then
        putStrLn "zero"
    else
        do  putStr "--> "
            print n

I'm pretty sure this format of if/then/else depends on a relatively recent change in GHC though; previously the then and else part had to be indented more than the if. I never found a way of writing if/then/else blocks that I was terribly comfortable with under that rule; fortunately they're not super common in Haskell due to pattern-matching and guards.

There are some inconsistencies in the way I use this style that I'm not fully happy with yet. For example, in a file I currently have open I have several functions of the form:

foo a b = simple expression c d
    where
        c = bar a
        d = baz b

Which looks fine, but then:

foo a b =
    complex multiline expression c d
    where
        c = bar a
        d = baz b

The where should logically be at a different indentation level from the main body of the function. But it shouldn't be more indented because it's a part of foo a b =, not a part of complex .... But neither do I want to respond by indenting complex ... one level more, because the jump to two indentation levels looks ugly, and it's unpleasant for its correct indentation level to be determined by whether or not there is a where block afterwards. Fortunately I mostly seem to use where when the definition of the function is a simple expression of some auxiliary definitions; if the function springs to mind as a large complex function of some auxiliary definitions I try to break it down into more independent parts.

I feel this style mostly avoids runaway indentation (it's also "refactor friendly" in terms not determining the correct indent position of code by the length of other bits of code), while still allowing me to visually determine the high-level structure of my code without having to do a detailed parse of the low-level structure.

I sometimes worry that I'm thinking too much like a Pythonista (with indent-levels) or a Mercuryista(?) (with code structures that have sections), rather than adopting Haskell's "indent things more than the position at which they started" approach. But as soon as things start getting complicated, things like your first pretty example become decidedly unpretty and unreadable to my tastes.

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Personally, I use a mix of both styles.

When the next "pretty" indentation layer is not too far away, I use the first style

do foo
   bar
   baz

But when a pretty indentation would lead to code that is too far on the right side, I use only two whitespaces

case foo of
  a -> bar
  b -> baz
  c -> quux

When I have an indentation of more than, say, 20 whitespaces, I often "reset" the indentation level:

do a
   b <- do c -- normally I use only two whitespaces here
           d
           e <- do
     f
     g
     h

In cases where you can place the first of a list of thing right after a keyword, I do that only if I use the pretty style

 main = do x
           y
           z where
   a = b
   c = d
   e = f

Your example

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA n = if n == 0
  then putStrLn "zero"
  else do putStr "--> "
          print n

In this example, however, I would refactor the code to use pattern matching and explicit monadic operations (in this case >>), replacing the do. If the do is short, don't do.

funcA :: Integer -> IO ()
funcA 0 = putStrLn "zero"
funcA n = putStr "--> " >> print n
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1  
My example just to show the indentation, of cause it's not from the real life. –  demi Jun 25 '12 at 19:26
    
Your reset example doesn't work in current Haskell: nested blocks must have strictly increasing indentation levels (for now). –  Daniel Wagner Jun 25 '12 at 20:31
    
@DanielWagner That's good to know. Wasn't there a pragma to disable that behavior? –  FUZxxl Jun 25 '12 at 20:33
    
@FUZxxl You may be thinking of NondecreasingIndentation, a Haskell' proposal (that's already implemented and doesn't require a language flag in GHC) that addresses a related but different issue. –  Daniel Wagner Jun 25 '12 at 20:43
    
@DanielWagner The reset style seems to work well in GHC 7.4.1. It might be related to the fact that where closes a block. –  FUZxxl Jun 25 '12 at 20:59
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