Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to send a POST request to a rails scaffold controller which contains a nested array representing records that need to be created and associated with the newly created parent.

Here is some example JSON:

{
    "plan_id":3,
    "weight":60,
    "exercise_sets": [
        {
            "created_at":"2012-06-13T14:55:57Z",
            "ended_at":"2012-06-13T14:55:57Z",
            "weight":"80.0",
            "repetitions":10,
            "exercise_id":1
        }
    ]
}

..and my models..

class Session < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :exercise_sets, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :exercises, :through => :exercise_sets
end

class ExerciseSet < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :exercise
  belongs_to :session
end

Is what I am attempting possible?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is certainly not impossible, though you may have to switch up your parameter naming a bit.

When you pass the JSON above to the controller, it either gets passed as parameters to a constructor:

Session.new(params[:session])

Or gets passed to the #update_attributes method on a persisted Session instance:

@session = Session.find(params[:id])
@session.update_attributes(params[:session])

Both the constructor and #update_attributes methods turn parameters like "plan_id" into assigment method calls. That is,

@session.update_attributes(:plan_id => "1")  

Turns into (inside the #update_attributes method):

@session.plan_id = "1"

So, this works for your plan_id and weight attributes, because you have both #plan_id= and #weight= setter methods. You also have an #exercise_sets= method given to you by has_many :exercise_sets. However, the #exercise_sets= method expects ExerciseSet objects, not ExerciseSet attributes.

Rails is capable of doing what you are trying to do via the #accepts_nested_attributes_for class method. Try this:

class Session < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :exercise_sets, :dependent => :destroy
  has_many :exercises, :through => :exercise_sets

  accepts_nested_attributes_for :exercise_sets

end

This sets up (metaprograms) an #exercise_sets_attributes= method for you. So just modify your JSON to:

{
"plan_id":3,
"weight":60,
"exercise_sets_attributes": [
    {
        "created_at":"2012-06-13T14:55:57Z",
        "ended_at":"2012-06-13T14:55:57Z",
        "weight":"80.0",
        "repetitions":10,
        "exercise_id":1
    }
]

}

More info: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/NestedAttributes/ClassMethods.html

share|improve this answer
    
That's just what I need :) - one question, I've added the above to my model and changed the json I'm sending to call exercise_sets_attributes do I need to alter my controller? It doesn't appear to be creating the associated records! –  Fred Jun 25 '12 at 20:29
    
..to clarify, associated exercise_sets don't already exist, i.e. no exercise_set_id will be passed so these records will also need to be created. –  Fred Jun 25 '12 at 21:16
    
You might need to namespace your JSON as well. Rails will expect your JSON to look like: {"session": {<your JSON from above} } If you look at your server logs you should see: Started POST to <your URL> Processing by SessionsController Parameters: {"sessions" => {"plan_id" => 3, "weight" => 80 ....} What you don't want to see is: Started POST to <your URL> Processing by SessionsController Parameters: {"plan_id" => 3, "weight" => 80 ....} –  Ben Jun 25 '12 at 21:49
    
I have no idea how to format comments, clearly :) –  Ben Jun 25 '12 at 21:53
    
Hmm, switching to {"session": ...} gives me a 500 error, {"sessions": ...} creates a new record with no attributes, what I had before seems to work most correctly (still missing the association though)? –  Fred Jun 25 '12 at 22:21

It's perfectly possible, you just have to add the following line to your Session model:

  accepts_nested_attributes_for :exercise_sets, :reject_if => lambda { |a| a[:exercise_id].blank? }, :allow_destroy => true

Now, when your controller does Session.new(params[:session]), Rails will build (or update) the Session and the related ExerciceSet(s).

Please review the :reject_if clause. That's where you define which records will be created and which will not.

This are the basics, but Ryan Bates explains the nested model forms perfectly (as always) in this screencast.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.