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Good day,

Hopefully this is a quick kill question. I am writing an application that uses JPanels and JLayeredPane inside a JFrame. On the initial start of my application, one of the panels does not show up until my mouse moves over the area where the panel should be. I even call the validate and repaint methods, but I am still able to display both panels together. Any suggestions? Thank you.

Here is my JFrame class (which has the main method)

import java.awt.Dimension;
import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JLayeredPane;
import javax.swing.JPanel;


public class Application extends JFrame
{
    public Application()
    {   
        this.setSize(500,500);
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        this.setVisible(true);

        JLayeredPane lp = new JLayeredPane();
        lp.setBounds(0,0,500,500);
        this.setLayeredPane(lp);

        Mypanel p1 = new Mypanel();
        Mypanel2 p2 = new Mypanel2();

        this.getLayeredPane().add(p1,0);
        this.getLayeredPane().add(p2,1);

        this.validate();
        this.repaint();
        this.validate();
    }


    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        Application app = new Application();

    }
}

Here is one of my panel classes

import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class Mypanel extends JPanel
{
    public JButton button;

    public Mypanel()
    {
        this.setLayout(null);
        this.setBounds(0, 0, 500, 500);
        JButton b = new JButton("Hello");
        b.setBounds(20,20,300,300);
        this.add(b);
    }
}

And finally my last panel class

import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JPanel;


public class Mypanel2 extends JPanel
{
    public JButton button;

    public Mypanel2()
    {
        this.setLayout(null);
        this.setBounds(0, 0, 500, 500);
        JButton b = new JButton("SUP");
        b.setBounds(20,10,200,200);
        this.add(b);
        this.repaint();
        this.validate();
        this.repaint();
    }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

First off, in a valid program only JComponent repaints itself. If at some point you find that calling c.repaint() from your controller code fixes some problem, you have neglected basic contracts that at the core of swing framework. And this is never a good idea. So removing all those repaint and validate calls is a good start. Next important thing is understanding how lightweight swing components go about painting their children. There are 2 modes: optimized and not optimized. The first one is only applicable when siblings don't overlap eachother in the container. If they do and optimized painting is on, you are going to get all sorts of weird behavior when those components repaint themselves(like when you hover mouse pointer over them). All lightweight components can handle overlapping children through setComponentZOrder() . JLayeredPane only introduces the concept of a layer as a means of controlling zorder in a more flexible way. It tries to be smart about what mode to choose to paint its children but, sadly there are subtleties to how this works. so this code would do what you need:

Mypanel p1 = new Mypanel();
Mypanel2 p2 = new Mypanel2();

getLayeredPane().setLayer(p1,0);
getLayeredPane().setLayer(p2,1);

getLayeredPane().add(p1);
getLayeredPane().add(p2);

and this wouldn't:

Mypanel p1 = new Mypanel();
Mypanel2 p2 = new Mypanel2();

getLayeredPane().add(p1);
getLayeredPane().add(p2);

getLayeredPane().setLayer(p1,0);
getLayeredPane().setLayer(p2,1);

the trick is to call setLayer before you add children to the container so that JLayeredPane would turn off optimized painting.

BTW I couldn't help but wonder why JLayeredPane? If you need switching programmatically between different layouts maybe JTabbedPane is your answer anyways

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Andrew! Thanks for the great response. So here is what I am really trying to do... I have a buffered image in the background that is going to be a 2D game. I don't want to write my own buttons and text field classes, so I was going to have a layer ontop of the layer that contains my image. Do you have a better idea how to go about doing that? –  Matthew Jun 26 '12 at 0:49
    
you might be needing to use a GlassPane rather then a JLayeredPane, in that case! docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/components/… –  David Kroukamp Jun 26 '12 at 4:03
    
There are plenty of ways to do what you need. I would start by making my own JPanel subclass, setting its opaque property to true and then overriding its paintComponent to draw the buffered image. There is no need to have JLabel or JButton just to draw the image. You can add / remove other swing components like JTextField or JButton via add()/ remove() methods. Simple! BTW It helps to have all your mouse handling/ painting encapsulated in a single component. In my experience adhering to MVC principle always pays off. espessialy in desktop/game development. –  Andrew Butenko Jun 26 '12 at 11:21
JLayeredPane lp = new JLayeredPane();
JPanel d = new JPanel();
d.setVisible(true);
d.setBounds(10, 10, 556, 386);
lp.add(d, new Integer(0), 0);
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to Stack Overflow, could you maybe provide some explanation together with your code? –  Jos Vinke Mar 19 '13 at 18:41

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