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I seem to have gotten myself into a joyous twist. I have a situation something like the following:

public class Parameter<T> {
   public Parameter(String value, Verifier<T> verif){
       //stuff, lots of stuff!
   }
}

public interface Verifier<T>{
   //definition
}

public enum StringVerif implements Verifiier<String>{
    INSTANCE;
    //some static functions on my singleton
}

public abstract class ParamFactory{
    private static ArrayDeque<Verifier<?>> verifList...
    ...
    for(Verifier<?> ver : verifList){
        if(ver.isapplicable(someData){
            //now I'm stuck!
        }
    }
}

In short what I need to do is create the right typed Parameter based on the type of the Verifier that passes the test. e.g. for a Verifier I need to be able to create a Parameter, for a Verifier I need to be able to create a Parameter. These Parameters will then get sent to another collection. In essence it's an extensible factory with verifier and processor modules that can parse different type parameters depending on need, pretty powerful . The problem is I not only have to get the generic type by reflection, but also to create a generic type from this type.

Any ideas on where to start to do this? It's been a long time since I dealt this deeply with generics

share|improve this question
    
A joyous twist indeed :) Look, I don't quite understand where you are stuck and I have a feeling there might be a better way ;) Could you add a paragraph explaining what it is you want to accomplish, either where you got stuck or in the overall program? thx! – Miquel Jun 25 '12 at 20:54
1  
This is quite confusing and your goal is unclear. – cheeken Jun 25 '12 at 20:59
    
The data structure you need is called HList (heterogeneous list), which is not very well supported in Java. (Needs a better type system.) – missingfaktor Jun 25 '12 at 21:06
    
Java generics are for compile time type checks. You are attempting to create one based on runtime information. No solution will be "elegant". – Affe Jun 25 '12 at 21:45
    
Clarified the goal a little. I understand it wont be elegant, There is something a little clunky about generics and reflection is rarely elegant. It is very powerful though. I'm not sure if it's a HList I'm looking for. The difficulty is that I need to be able to create a Parameter of the same type as the transformer I have – K.Barad Jun 26 '12 at 3:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Turns out I'd been approaching this wrongly. The correct technique was that each Verifier is responsible for making the call to the constructor, and since each verifier already knows it's own type it's just a couple of lines. It somewhat breaks the factory concept, unless you consider these verifiers to truly be a component of the factory

public interface Verifier<T>{
   //definition
   public Err buildParaList(String value, Single<Parameter<?>> output);
}

public enum StringVerif implements Verifiier<String>{
    INSTANCE;
    //some static functions on my singleton
    @Override
    public Err buildParaList(String value, Single<Parameter<?>> output){
        output.elem = new Parameter<String>(value, INSTANCE);
        return Err.success();
    }
}
public abstract class ParamFactory{
    private static ArrayDeque<Verifier<?>> verifList...
    ...
    for(Verifier<?> ver : verifList){
        if(ver.isapplicable(someData){
            Single<Parameter<?>> param = new Single<Parameter<?>>();
            Err e = ver.buildParameter(value, param);
            //checks
            paramList.add(param.elem);
        }
    }
}

ok my real usage is more complex than the example but it still works. I really should have thought of this before, I guess I wasn't so alert last night. Thanks for the support.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this approach fits your use case well. – missingfaktor Jun 26 '12 at 6:16

Expanding on my earlier comment regarding HLists: (This was too big for a comment, so posting it as an answer.)

I am using Scala for the code examples, as it has a good support for the idea being discussed. All the code examples are typed at console.

When you have an object of type Dog, and another object of type Tiger, if you put them in a same covariant list, the resulting list will have type List[Animal] where Animal is their common super type. The original types are lost because this list is homogeneous. Notice the inferred type of list below:

scala> class Animal
defined class Animal

scala> class Dog extends Animal
defined class Dog

scala> class Tiger extends Animal
defined class Tiger

scala> List(new Tiger, new Dog)
res0: List[Animal] = List(Tiger@a32604, Dog@1150b68)

Similarly Verifier[Int] and Verifier[String] when put in a single homogeneous list will assume type Verifier[Any]. (In Scala, Any class lies at the top of the object hierarchy.) See:

scala> class Verifier[+T](value: T) {
     |   override def toString = "Verifier(" + value.toString + ")"
     | }
defined class Verifier

scala> List(new Verifier(6), new Verifier("hello"))
res1: List[Verifier[Any]] = List(Verifier(6), Verifier(hello))

If you want to preserve the static types, and use them for computations latter, you should use heterogeneous list. Or HList for short.

scala> new Verifier(6) :: new Verifier("hello") :: HNil
res2: shapeless.::[Verifier[Int],shapeless.::[Verifier[java.lang.String],shapeless.HNil]] = Verifier(6) :: Verifier(hello) :: HNil

Here is how polymorphic mapping works with that:

scala> class Parameter[+T](value: String, verif: Verifier[T]) {
     |   override def toString = "P(" + value + ", " + verif + ")"
     | }
defined class Parameter

scala> object mapper extends (Verifier ~> Parameter) {
     |   def apply[A](v: Verifier[A]): Parameter[A] = new Parameter("k", v)
     | }
defined module mapper

scala> res2 map mapper
res3: mapper.Out = P(k, Verifier(6)) :: P(k, Verifier(hello)) :: HNil

We preserved the type parameters, and acted upon each element of the list with the given higher-ranked function. That gave us back a HList of Parameters where the correct types were preserved.

Note that the concept of HList can be implemented in Java, but you cannot define many useful operations on the structure. Java's type system isn't capable of it. Here is a great article on the topic, if you are interested.

Hope this is helpful in some way.

share|improve this answer
    
It's interesting, but the java equivalent is completely nonsensical. Type erasure is a general issue in java, but the HList concept for it is not usable. Also consider: I'm only using String and integer as examples. I could have 100s of different types of checker, including several of the same type but applicable to different situations, depending on the usage. Maybe in Java 8 huh? – K.Barad Jun 26 '12 at 15:21
    
@K.Barad, type erasure is irrelevant here. It's the lack of type inference that makes HList unusable in Java. (Rather, it's one of the many reasons.) – missingfaktor Jun 26 '12 at 15:29
    
@K.Barad, HList operations require several type system features Java lacks. (Higher kinds, type-classes, declaration-site variance to mention a few.) Java-8 won't help much. – missingfaktor Jun 26 '12 at 15:31
    
By the way, the point of post was to inform that the idea you were thinking around is possible and has been implemented. It's only that it hasn't made to mainstream yet. – missingfaktor Jun 26 '12 at 15:32

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