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I have a string in Python 2.7.2 say u"\u0638". When I write it to file:

f = open("J:\\111.txt", "w+")
f.write(u"\u0638".encode('utf-16'))
f.close()

In hex it looks like: FF FE 38 06 When i print such a string to stdout i will see: '\xff\xfe8\x06'.

The querstion: Where is \x38 in the string output to stdout? In other words why the string output to stdout is not '\xff\xfe\x38\x06'?

If I write the string to file twice:

f = open("J:\\111.txt", "w+")
f.write(u"\u0638".encode('utf-16'))
f.write(u"\u0638".encode('utf-16'))
f.close()

The hex representation in file contains byte order mark (BOM) \xff\xfe twice: FF FE 38 06 FF FE 38 06

I wonder what is the techique to avoid writting BOM in UTF-16 encoded strings?

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

The ASCII character 8 has hex representation 0x38. So your string:

\xff\xfe8\x06

is four bytes long. Separated by spaces, the bytes are:

\xff \xfe 8 \x06

Python uses the \x notation for bytes that do not represent printable ASCII characters.

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Put another way: '\x38' == '8' – Ned Batchelder Jun 25 '12 at 21:24
    
The answer would have been much more obvious if the example in the original question was u'\u063a'. – Mark Ransom Jun 25 '12 at 21:41

Encoding to "utf-16le" or "utf-16be" (little endian or big endian) should skip writing the BOM. Without the BOM, of course, the decoder needs to know which endianness to expect.

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Can't mark 2 answers as accepted:). Thanks for the answer! – Romeno Jun 25 '12 at 21:34

\xff\xfe8\x06 does contain \x38! 8 == \x38.

For your second question, to avoid a BOM, if you are explicit about the endianness (using UTF-16BE or UTF-16LE codecs), no BOM will be printed.

However, the right thing to do is to use a file wrapper which handles encoding and decoding for you, and use unicode in your program. In Python 3.0, the open builtin function can do this:

fp = open(filename, 'w', encoding='utf-16')
fp.write(u'write one line\n')
fp.write(u'write another line\n')
fp.close()

In Python 2.x, use the codec wrapper:

fp = codecs.open(filename, 'w', 'utf-16')
fp.write(u'write one line\n')
fp.write(u'write another line\n')
fp.close()
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