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I've started Windows socket programming a couple of weeks ago.

I've so far created a C style client application (IOCP based) that communicates with a networked hardware device in VC++ 2010. The application communicates asynchronously with the device (acting as server) through either LAN or serial port:

  • Create socket / or handle to serial port
  • Connect to server
  • Build command of type std::vector (e.g., Logon command)
  • Send command via socket or serial port
  • Receive response via socket or serial port
  • Disconnect from the server

Now I'd like to make my existing client application more object-oriented and I've come up with the following class hierarchy (params are omitted):

class IClient
{
public:
    virtual bool Connect() = 0;
    virtual bool Disconnect() = 0;
    virtual bool Send() = 0;
    virtual bool Receive() = 0;
    ...
};

class Client : public IClient
{
public:
    Client();
    virtual ~Client();

    virtual bool Connect() = 0;
    virtual bool Disconnect() = 0;
    virtual bool Send() = 0;
    virtual bool Receive() = 0;
    ...

private:
    std::string m_strConnectionSettings; // IP address, port number etc
};

class SerialClient : public Client
{
public:
    bool Connect()
    {
        ...
        m_hPort = CreateFile(_T("COM3"), GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE, 0, NULL, OPEN_EXISTING, 0, NULL);
        ...
    }

    bool Disconnect()
    {
        ...
        CloseHandle(m_hPort);
        ...
    }

    bool Send()
    {
        ...
        WriteFile(m_hPort, (LPCVOID)(&vecByteData[0]), vecByteData.size(), &dwNumberOfBytesWritten, NULL);
        ...
    }

    bool Receive()
    {
        ...
        ReadFile(m_hPort, (LPVOID)&vecBuffer[0], vecBuffer.size(), &dwNumberOfBytesRead, NULL);
        ...
    }
    ...

private:
    HANDLE m_hPort; // Handle returned by CreateFile().
    DCM m_dcb;
};

class SocketClient : public Client
{
public:
    SocketClient();
    virtual ~SocketClient();

    virtual bool Connect() = 0;
    virtual bool Disconnect() = 0;
    virtual bool Send() = 0;
    virtual bool Receive() = 0;
    ...

private:
    SOCKET m_socket; // Handle returned by WSASocket().
};

class TcpClient : public SocketClient
{
public:
    TcpClient();
    ~TcpClient();

    bool Connect()
    {
        ...
        WSAConnect(m_sock, (LPSOCKADDR)&server, sizeof(server), NULL, NULL, NULL, NULL);
        ...
    }

    bool Disconnect()
    {
        ...
        closesocket(m_sock);
        ...
    }

    bool Send()
    {
        ...
        WSASend(m_sock, ...);
        ...
    }

    bool Receive()
    {
        ...
        WSARecv(m_sock, ...);
        ...
    }
    ...
};

class UdpClient : public SocketClient
{
public:
    UdpClient();
    ~UdpClient();

    bool Connect();
    bool Disconnect();
    bool Send();
    bool Receive();
    ...
};

However, my knowledge on computer network is still rudimentary so I find it difficult to translate computer networks concepts into a C++ design. For example, in the above design I don't know where “Port” comes in. If I had “Port” class and “Socket” class, would the “Port” class contain the “Socket“ class or opposite or nonsense?

I'd appreciate it if you could give me some feedback regarding the design above.

  • I've taken a very brief look at Boost.Asio to see how it's designed.
  • Sorry if my question is vague.
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

typical socket abstraction model

  • socket, something on the server end
  • client, something modeled on the server end (one socket has many clients)
  • connection, modeled on the client end

Typically the port number is part of the socket.listen method on the server and part of a connection.connect method on the client

Same with IP address

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your response. I was thinking more like "socket" being something on the server end and the client end, for example link. Also would "connection" contain a socket object as its member variable? So if you did something like connection.connect(“IP Address“, “Port”) then internally it would create a socket object and call WSAConnect()? – jpen Jun 26 '12 at 14:01
    
from my view 'socket' is something the user (coder) needs to know about on the server side. the fact that under the hood there is also a wsa construct called 'socket' on each end is an internal implementation detail that you should hide – pm100 Jun 26 '12 at 15:36
    
So how would you change the hierarchy above? BTW my design is only concerned about the client side (I don’t have any control over the server side implementation). My original idea was to hide a socket handle inside "TcpClient" and "UdpClient". – jpen Jun 26 '12 at 15:53
    
the design is fine. Port is part of connect method. If you insist in having abstract base class then you should remove connect from base. Connection setup is very different between communication methods. Either add 'connect' method in derived classes or have a static factory method that returns an IClient-derived instance – pm100 Jun 26 '12 at 16:25
    
I don't understand why "connect" should be removed from base. I understand connection setup is very different between communication methods. That's why I've made the Connect() function virtual. Have I misunderstood something? I was thinking to use "SerialClient" and "TcpClient" like this (see edit in code). Many thanks. – jpen Jun 27 '12 at 8:35

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