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What is a good way to overcome the unfortunate fact that this code will not work as desired:

<div class="required">
    <label>Name:</label>
    <input type="text">
</div>

<style>
    .required input:after { content:"*"; }
</style>

In a perfect world, all required inputs would get the little asterisk indicating that the field is required. This solution impossible since the CSS is inserted after the element content, not after the element itself, but something like it would be ideal. On a site with thousands of required fields, I can move the asterisk in front of the input with one change to one line (:after to :before) or I can move it to the end of the label (.required label:after) or in front of the label, or to a position on the containing box, etc...

This is important not just in case I change my mind about where to place the asterisk everywhere, but also for odd cases where the form layout doesn't allow the asterisk in the standard position. It also plays well with validation that checks the form or highlights improperly completed controls.

Lastly, it doesn't add additional markup.

Are there any good solutions that have all or most of the advantages of the impossible code?

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perhaps apply a background image of an asterisk? –  Valamas - AUS Jun 25 '12 at 21:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 13 down vote accepted

A similar outcome could be achieved by using a background image of a picture of an asterisk and setting the background of the label/input/the outer div and a padding of the size of the asterisk image. Something like this:

.required input {
   padding-right: 25px;
   background-image: url(...);
   background-position: right top;
}

This will put the asterisk INSIDE the text box, but putting the same on div.required instead of .required input will probably be more what you're looking for, if a little less elegant.

This method doesn't require an additional input.

I keep getting the odd upvote for this post. This answer was right for the OP but probably won't be the best option in most cases. The :after styntax is much better.

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Its worth noting, however, that this isn't very screen-reader friendly. Max's answer is much better in this respect. In fact in most cases, Max's answer is more ideal - just not for the OP. –  jaypeagi Jun 28 '13 at 10:57

Is that what you had in mind?

http://jsfiddle.net/erqrN/1/

<div class="required">
    <label>Name:</label>
    <input type="text">
</div>

<style>
    .required:after { content:" *"; }
</style>​
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2  
That is a good solution in many situations, however it doesn't work if absolute positioning or floats are being used to line up the forms (e.g. jsfiddle.net/erqrN/2). I am actually using absolute positioning to line up my forms. I could absolutely position the * but it would mean that I would have to manually put in the distance for every length of form input, and wouldn't be able to have any flexible inputs. –  brentonstrine Jun 25 '12 at 22:11
.required label {
    font-weight: bold;
}
.required label:after {
    color: #e32;
    content: ' *';
    display:inline;
}

Fiddle with your exact structure: http://jsfiddle.net/bQ859/

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To put it exactly INTO input as it is shown on the following image:

enter image description here

I found the following approach:

.asterisk_input:after {
content:" *"; 
color: #e32;
position: absolute; 
margin: 0px 0px 0px -20px; 
font-size: xx-large; 
padding: 0 5px 0 0; }


 <form>
    <div>              
        <input type="text" size="15" />                                 
        <span class="asterisk_input">  </span>            
    </div>            
</form> 

Site on which I work is coded using fixed layout so it was ok for me.

I'm not sure that that it's good for liquid design.

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This is basically the same approach as the accepted answer, isn't it? –  brentonstrine May 31 '14 at 1:32
    
yes, it looks the same. The difference is that he used background-image. (or I've misunderstood something) –  Alex Shulzhenko May 31 '14 at 2:07
    
Oh yes, I see. Sorry about that--your answer is different. :) –  brentonstrine May 31 '14 at 7:14
input[required], select[required] {
    background-image: url('/img/star.png');
    background-repeat: no-repeat;
    background-position-x: right;
}

Image has some 20px space on the right not to overlap with select dropdown arrow

enter image description here

And it looks like this: enter image description here

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You should not use CSS or background images when conveying pertinent information to users as these are not available to assistive technology users and by doing so, you are effectively excluding individuals by making your form unusable to them.

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You could also use absolute positioning...

http://jsfiddle.net/SpzTP/1/

.required {
  display: inline-block;
  position: relative;
}
.required label:after {
  content:"*";
  display: block;
  position: absolute;
  right: -.6em;
  top: 0;
}

In the fiddle I include an option to place the '*' after the input or after the label.

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