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I am trying to write a simple program that will let me enter a name and then it will search the employeeList to see if the person is a manager or not. The person will be a manager if their employee number is 500 or larger.

So with ["David", 501] for example, how do you specify just the number part in the conditional statement? I have used item for the names but am not sure what to do to specify the numbers. Thanks!

#!/usr/bin/python

input = raw_input("Please enter name to determine if employee is a manager: ")

employeeList = [["Shawn", 500], ["David", 501], ["Ted", 14], ["Jerry", 22]]

for item in employeeList :
    print "Employee Name is: ", item
    if item == input and item >= 500:
        print "This person is a manager."
    else:
        print "This person is not a manager."
share|improve this question
2  
Using input as a variable name is not a good idea, input() is already the name of a function. –  Levon Jun 25 '12 at 21:52
    
also your if clause is wrong, but you will notice it soon ;) –  Antti Haapala Jun 25 '12 at 21:52
1  
Thanks everyone and yes I did realize now that my if clause is wrong :) I will remember about the input name as well for the future. –  Christopher Jun 25 '12 at 21:53
    
In addition, a dict is the correct data structure to solve this problem, not a list of lists. –  Chinmay Kanchi Jun 25 '12 at 22:02
    
@ChinmayKanchi yup - agreed - my answer used that with a .get() default for invalid lookups... –  Jon Clements Jun 25 '12 at 22:21

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You may use numeric indices to reference specific elements in a list. Since you're using a list of lists, we can reference indices off of the item loop variable.

Here is your for-loop adjusted accordingly:

for item in employeeList:
  print "Employee name is: %s" % (item[0])
  if item[0] == input and item[1] >= 500:
    print "This person is a manager."
  else:
    print "This person is not a manager."
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item[0] will be the name, and item[1] their employee number.

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This really should be something as:

lookup = dict( (name, ' is a manager' if num >= 500 else ' is not a manager') for name, num in employeeList)
print '{}{}'.format(some_name_from_somewhere, lookup.get(some_name_from_somewhere, ' is not known'))
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First of all, note that in your example you are not using a list of tuples but a list of list. tuples are defined with normal brackets

("I", "am", "a", "tuple")

Sequence access

In Python, list and tuple are sequences, so they can be accessed with numeric indices

For lists:

item = ["Shawn", 501], then you can do item[0] and item[1].

For tuples, it's exactly the same:

item = ("Shawn", 501), then you can do item[0] and item[1].

Unpacking

When your tuples are small, 'opening' them - unpacking being the Python term - is also very handy

item = ("Shawn", 501)
name, number = item # We unpack the content of the tuple into some variables

Named tuples

Python 2.6 has introduced a namedtuple() type which you may find useful. With your example, you could do something like the following:

Employee = namedtuple("Employee", ['name', 'number'])
employeeList = [
    Employee("Shawn", 500),
    Employee("David", 501),
    Employee("Ted", 14],
    Employee("Jerry", 22)
]
for item in employeeList:
    if item.name == name and item.number >= 500:
        print "This person is a manager."
    else:
        print "This person is not a manager."
share|improve this answer

What's the point of printing out every item in your list?

You only need to find the queried person and check if he/she is a manager

#!/usr/bin/python

input = raw_input("Please enter name to determine if employee is a manager: ")

employeeList = [["Shawn", 500], ["David", 501], ["Ted", 14], ["Jerry", 22]]
employeeDict = dict(employeeList)

if input in employeeDict:
    if employeeDict[input] > 500:
        print "This person is a manager."
    else:
        print "This person is not a manager."
else:
    print "This person is not an employee."
share|improve this answer

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