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I've never used JSON before so I'm not familiar with its syntax.

At the moment I have multiple arrays containing different pieces of data.

I would like to create one JSON object, that contains the multiple arrays each with several pieces of data.

E.g.

An object called cars, containing multiple arrays each for a different make of car. In each array would be the model of car along with some other types of data e.g. number of doors (doesn't really matter its just a fictional example.)

It would be greatly appreciated if someone explained the syntax with an example. Thanks.

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You don't work with JSON directly, except in very rare circumstances. You work with native data structures, then use a library to convert that structure to a JSON string. –  Marc B Jun 25 '12 at 21:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

On the outermost level, a JSON object starts with a { and end with a }.

Sample data:

{
    "cars": {
        "Nissan": [
            {"model":"Sentra", "doors":4},
            {"model":"Maxima", "doors":4}
        ],
        "Ford": [
            {"model":"Taurus", "doors":4},
            {"model":"Escort", "doors":4}
        ]
    }
}

If the JSON is assigned to a variable called data, then accessing it would be like the following:

data.cars['Nissan'][0].model   // Sentra
data.cars['Nissan'][1].model   // Maxima
data.cars['Nissan'][2].doors   // 4

for (var make in data.cars) {
    for (var i = 0; i < data.cars[make].length; i++) {
        var model = data.cars[make][i].model;
        var doors = data.cars[make][i].doors;
        alert(make + ', ' + model + ', ' + doors);
    }
}

Another approach (using an associative array for car models rather than an indexed array):

{
    "cars": {
        "Nissan": {
            "Sentra": {"doors":4, "transmission":"automatic"},
            "Maxima": {"doors":4, "transmission":"automatic"}
        },
        "Ford": {
            "Taurus": {"doors":4, "transmission":"automatic"},
            "Escort": {"doors":4, "transmission":"automatic"}
        }
    }
}

data.cars['Nissan']['Sentra'].doors   // 4
data.cars['Nissan']['Maxima'].doors   // 4
data.cars['Nissan']['Maxima'].transmission   // automatic

for (var make in data.cars) {
    for (var model in data.cars[make]) {
        var doors = data.cars[make][model].doors;
        alert(make + ', ' + model + ', ' + doors);
    }
}

Edit:

Correction: A JSON object starts with { and ends with }, but it's also valid to have a JSON array (on the outermost level), that starts with [ and ends with ].

Also, significant syntax errors in the original JSON data have been corrected: All key names in a JSON object must be in double quotes, and all string values in a JSON object or a JSON array must be in double quotes as well.

See:

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Thanks for the comprehensive answer, especially how to access it. –  Harry Jun 25 '12 at 22:00
    
Just to clarify: is this an object? Does it need [] brackets? –  Harry Jun 25 '12 at 22:03
1  
The JSON data is an object (basically an associative array). Indexed arrays use square brackets, [0,1,2], while associative arrays use curly braces, {x:1,y:2,z:3}. Any of the data within the outermost object can be either type of array, but the outermost object itself has to use curly braces. –  Matt Coughlin Jun 25 '12 at 22:10
1  
for (var town in markers.towns) { alert(markers.towns[town].lat) } –  Matt Coughlin Jun 25 '12 at 22:24
1  
Sure, no problem :) I added some examples of iterating through the JSON data in both examples above. –  Matt Coughlin Jun 25 '12 at 22:32
var cars = [
    manufacturer: [
        {
            color: 'gray',
            model: '1',
            nOfDoors: 4
        },
        {
            color: 'yellow',
            model: '2',
            nOfDoors: 4
        }
    ]
]
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What about having a car manufacturer array inside the object? so cars > manufacturer > model, color, doors. (arrays within arrays within an object) –  Harry Jun 25 '12 at 21:51
    
See the update. Is that what you want? –  Danilo Valente Jun 25 '12 at 21:53
    
Yeah thanks. :) –  Harry Jun 25 '12 at 22:00

A good book I'm reading: Professional JavaScript for Web Developers by Nicholas C. Zakas 3rd Edition has the following information regarding JSON Syntax:

"JSON Syntax allows the representation of three types of values".

Regarding the one you're interested in, Arrays it says:

"Arrays are represented in JSON using array literal notation from JavaScript. For example, this is an array in JavaScript:

var values = [25, "hi", true];

You can represent this same array in JSON using a similar syntax:

[25, "hi", true]

Note the absence of a variable or a semicolon. Arrays and objects can be used together to represent more complex collections of data, such as:

[
    {
        "title": "Professional JavaScript",
        "authors": [
            "Nicholas C. Zakas"
        ],
        edition: 3,
        year: 2011
    },
    {
        "title": "Professional JavaScript",
        "authors": [
            "Nicholas C.Zakas"
        ],
        edition: 2,
        year: 2009
    },
    {
        "title": "Professional Ajax",
        "authors": [
            "Nicholas C. Zakas",
            "Jeremy McPeak",
            "Joe Fawcett"
        ],
        edition: 2,
        year: 2008
    }
]

This Array contains a number of objects representing books, Each object has several keys, one of which is "authors", which is another array. Objects and arrays are typically top-level parts of a JSON data structure (even though this is not required) and can be used to create a large number of data structures."

To serialize (convert) a JavaScript object into a JSON string you can use the JSON object stringify() method. For the example from Mark Linus answer:

var cars = {
    color: 'gray',
    model: '1',
    nOfDoors: 4
},
{
    color: 'yellow',
    model: '2',
    nOfDoors: 4
};

cars is now a JavaScript object. To convert it into a JSON object you could do:

var jsonCars = JSON.stringify(cars);

To do the opposite, convert a JSON object into a JavaScript object (this is called parsing), you would use the parse() method. Search for those terms if you need more information... or get the book, it has many examples.

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