Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i have a question for you!

I have a C program in which i have a dynamic 2d array in my main function:

int **neighbours;

which i initialize based on args from command line. The problem is that i want to clean up the code a bit. To do that i want to create a function in a header file that takes the array uninitialized as a reference argument and initialize it there.

This is how i call the function:

init(&nodeNum, &neighbours, argv[1], &nodes);

this is how i declare the function in the header file:

int init(int *nodeNum, int ***neighbours, char *arg, struct node **nodes)

and this is how try to allocate the memory:

neighbours=malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
        for(i=0;i<*nodeNum;i++){
            neighbours[i] = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
        }

well obviously something doesn't go well and it crashes! any hints on what i may be doing wrong?

thanks to the help of some nice people the malloc now works, but filling the nodes failes!

here is the whole code of the function:

int init(int *nodeNum, int ***neighbours, char *arg, struct node **nodes){
FILE *file;
char buffer[4];
int i,y,distance;

if(strcmp(arg,"-l")==0){
        file = fopen("C:\\Users\\trendkiller\\thesis\\matrix.txt","r");
        printf("parsing adjacency matrix from file\n\n");
        //file = fopen ("C:\\Users\\trendkiller\\thesis\\matrix.txt", "r" ) ;
        *nodeNum = atoi(fgets(buffer,4,file));
        *neighbours=malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
        for(i=0;i<*nodeNum;i++){
            (*neighbours)[i] = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
        }
        printf("this prints\n");
        printf("number of nodes: %s", buffer);
        for(i=0;i<*nodeNum;i++){
            for(y=0;y<*nodeNum;y++){
                fgets(buffer,4,file);
                (*neighbours)[i][y]=atoi(buffer);
                            }
        }


    }
    else{
        *nodeNum = atoi(arg);

        *neighbours=malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
        printf("this prints\n");
        for(i=0;i<*nodeNum;i++){
            (*neighbours)[i] = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
        }

        *nodes=malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(struct node));

        for(i=0;i<30;i++){
            (*nodes)[i].x=rand()%100;
            (*nodes)[i].y=rand()%100;
        }
        printf("this prints\n");

        printf("creating new adjacency matrix\n\n");
        for(i=0; i<*nodeNum; i++){
            for(y=0; y<*nodeNum; y++){
                distance=sqrt((((*nodes)[y].x-(*nodes)[i].x)*((*nodes)[y].x-(*nodes)[i].x))+(((*nodes)[y].y-(*nodes)[i].y)*((*nodes)[y].y-(*nodes)[i].y)));
                if(i==y){
                    (*neighbours)[i][y]=-1;
                }
                else if(distance<=20){
                    (*neighbours)[i][y]=1;
                }
                else {
                    (*neighbours)[i][y]=0;
                }
            }

        }

        file = fopen("C:\\Users\\trendkiller\\thesis\\matrix.txt","a+");
        fprintf(file,"%d\n",*nodeNum);
        for(i=0;i<*nodeNum;i++){
            for(y=0;y<*nodeNum;y++){
                fprintf(file,"%d\n", (*neighbours)[i][y]);
            }
        }
    }

return 0;

}

Thanks in advance for your help!

share|improve this question
    
You have a pointer to pointer, not an 2D array. You might use this as an emulation for that, but why not just use dynamic 2D arrays as they come in C since C99. Also what the purpose of your arg and nodes are is not clear. –  Jens Gustedt Jun 25 '12 at 22:31
    
i am not sure what you mean "just use dynamic 2D arrays" i thought that is what i am doing! (just not successfully..) the arg param is the first argument from the command line, which is a number or a string. if it is a number i create that many nodes in the "struct node *nodes" else if it is a string i parse an adjacency matrix (neighbours) from a file which again also fills the "struct node *nodes" array. –  tk66 Jun 26 '12 at 7:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that neighbours is passed by value, so modifications to it inside the function have no effect. You need to pass it by pointer, and modify it indirectly:

int init(int *nodeNum, int ***neighbours_ptr, char *arg, struct node *nodes) {
    *neighbours_ptr = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
    for(i=0;i<*nodeNum;i++){
        (*neighbours_ptr)[i] = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));
    }
}

You also need to pass &neighbours instead of neighbours as the second argument of init.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it does make sense this way! but still it doesn't run! –  tk66 Jun 26 '12 at 8:09
    
@tk66 Could you please elaborate on the "does not run" part? Does it crash? What do you see in the debugger? By the way, why do you pass it a pointer to nodeNum rather than nodeNum, and why do you pass nodes at all? –  dasblinkenlight Jun 26 '12 at 8:13
    
it wasn't allocating the memory correctly but now it does! but now it crashes when i try to fill the node array. I pass it as an argument because i need to malloc this as well and use it from the main function later. nodeNum is also somehting i have to use later in the main function and it gets it's value in the init function when parsing the arguments or a file. –  tk66 Jun 26 '12 at 8:34
    
@tk66 If you need to malloc nodes as well, you should pass it by pointer to pointer, too. –  dasblinkenlight Jun 26 '12 at 8:36
    
isn't this what i am now doing? i updated the code ! (i haven't coded in C for some time now, so sorry if i am doing stupid things! java ruined me!) –  tk66 Jun 26 '12 at 9:00

In the example code you give one error is here:

neighbours[i] = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int *));

where it should be

neighbours[i] = malloc(*nodeNum*sizeof(int));

Why do you use an emulation of a 2D array instead of a real one? This works since C99:

int (*neighbours)[nodeNum] = malloc(sizeof(int[nodeNum][nodeNum]));

You would not have a need of an init such as yours that just allocates memory.

Why to you pass a pointer to nodeNum and not the value directly? If you still need an init function that does some initialization and not just allocation. The interface would look something like

void init(size_t nodeNum, int neighbours[nodeNum][nodeNum]);
share|improve this answer
    
i need the init function because it does other stuff as well.. and i need the nodeNum as a pointer because it depends on the argument of the args, which is parsed in the init. i will edit my post to include the whole code of the function init! thanks for your time! –  tk66 Jun 26 '12 at 8:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.