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Due to a sad situation I receive HTML like this:

<p>Perform the following commands:
   <code>&gt; cd /foo</code><code>&gt; adb shell</code><code># ps</code>
</p>

and I need to make code like appear visually like:

Perform the following commands:
> cd /foo
> adb shell
# ps

I thought I'd be tricky and use the CSS Adjacent Sibling Selector:

code + code:before { content:'\A'; white-space:pre }

...but then I discovered that this applies even to something like:

<p>If you go to your <code>C:\</code> directory and run <code>dir</code> …</p>

Is there a CSS-only solution to select adjacent elements without intervening non-element nodes?

If and only if there is not, feel free to suggest a JavaScript (including jQuery) solution.

share|improve this question
    
Can you give us a fiddle to work with? and put a div with the output you want to get. –  gdoron Jun 25 '12 at 22:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This works:

$('code').each(function() {
    var prev = this.previousSibling;
    var next = this.nextSibling;
    if ((prev && prev.tagName === 'CODE') ||
        (next && next.tagName === 'CODE')) {
        $(this).addClass('block');
    }
});​

Then in your CSS use the .block selector to add display: block and any other desired styles to the matched elements.

demo at http://jsfiddle.net/alnitak/JYzGg/

It would be pretty easy to code this as pure Javascript if you don't already have jQuery loaded - jQuery just happens to make adding the class easier than pure JS if you should have other class names already on those elements.

share|improve this answer
    
Cool, +1, better than mine. –  gdoron Jun 25 '12 at 22:22
    
@gdoron thx - shame I already hit the rep cap today ;-) –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 22:27
    
@Alnitak Well, at least you get the +15 ;) Thanks. –  Phrogz Jun 25 '12 at 22:27
    
Regarding adding the class in pure JS: is there something wrong with foo.className += " bar";? –  Phrogz Jun 25 '12 at 22:42
    
@Phrogz depends on whether the browser normalises the string to eliminate duplicates - my code above will actually update any "middle" elements twice. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 23:08

While I see that you've already accepted an answer, I thought I'd offer this as an alternative:

$('code').each(
    function(){
        if (this.previousSibling == this.previousElementSibling){
            $(this).addClass('block');
        }
        else {
            $(this).addClass('inline');
        }
    });​

JS Fiddle demo.

This will, of course, only run on those browsers that implement previousElementSibling (but I think the majority of browsers that implement the CSS pseudo-elements do implement this feature).

And, in pure vanilla JavaScript:

var codes = document.getElementsByTagName('code');

for (var i=0, len=codes.length; i<len; i++){
    var cur = codes[i];
    codes[i].className = cur.previousSibling == cur.previousElementSibling ? 'block' : 'inline';
}​

JS Fiddle demo.

And because I prefer a slightly tidier approach to adding classes (as opposed to explicitly adding a space-character before the new class I'm adding) there's this approach as well:

function addClass(elem,newClass){
    if (!elem) {
        return false;
    }
    else {
        var curClass = elem.className;
        if (curClass.length){
            return curClass + ' ' + newClass;
        }
        else {
            return newClass;
        }
    }
}

var codes = document.getElementsByTagName('code');

for (var i=0, len=codes.length; i<len; i++){
    var cur = codes[i];
    codes[i].className = cur.previousSibling == cur.previousElementSibling ? addClass(cur,'block') : addClass(cur,'inline');
}​

JS Fiddle demo.


Edited in response to the comments raised by Alnitak (the second of which I'd realised as I went to make myself a cup of tea, the first I hadn't considered at all):

var codes = document.getElementsByTagName('code');

for (var i=0, len=codes.length; i<len; i++){
    var cur = codes[i];
    codes[i].className = cur.previousSibling == codes[i-1] || cur.nextSibling == codes[i+1]? addClass(cur,'block') : addClass(cur,'inline');
}​

JS Fiddle demo

References:

share|improve this answer
    
while your code checks that the previous node is actually an element, it doesn't check that it's a <code> element. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 23:12
    
by only checking the previous node it also fails to modify the first <code> element that appears in a sequence. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 23:16
    
@Alnitak: I hadn't considered the first of your points until I read your comment, though I was about to address the latter (after making a cup of tea, admittedly)...still, I think it's addressed now. –  David Thomas Jun 25 '12 at 23:26
    
Your fix is still wrong - the i == 0 check only matches the very first <code> element in the document, not the first in any sequence that might appear. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 23:30
1  
and don't worry about plagiarism - your pure JS solution is actually kinda neat in the way it accesses the live nodelist to check the sibling relationships. It avoids the extra condition in the node && node.prop tests that I have in my jQuery answer. –  Alnitak Jun 25 '12 at 23:36

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